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Friday, December 2, 2016

A Message To World Leaders: Ignore The Financial Markets

A Message To World Leaders: Ignore The Financial Markets

A solution for the eurozone? Listen to the people, not to the markets.

For 40 years, there has been a tug of war between government in democracies and what we may call “the other government.” By the latter I mean, of course, the financial markets. James Carville highlighted his concerns when he announced that in the next life he would want to be a bond trader. Alan Greenspan followed the bond markets religiously for signs of increased or reduced inflationary expectations.

Now Europe faces the threat of a financial market rebellion. Democracy has spoken loudly in this weekend’s elections on the Continent and in England. Voters said, “We have had all the austerity economics we can take.” They threw over Sarkozy in France and many Conservative and Liberal candidates in England. In Greece they ran for the extremes. The moderate liberal Pasok party won the least votes in memory, but it may yet form a coalition to run a new government. Italian election results will be in soon.

And democracy is working! The instinct among those in the financial markets is that democracy usually reflects the weak-willed demands of the public. But the public is generally right this time, and it has been many times before. Austerity economics is self-destructive when economies are so weak.

Yet of course the financial markets’ initial reaction to the European elections was to sell, as if austerity economics was actually working to make nations’ bond payments easier to handle. It was not! But the markets fear that a new strategy will make matters worse.

Political leaders should ignore the financial markets in the short run, pure and simple. This may drive up financing costs for a while, but the eurozone should absorb those and adjust policies. The European Central Bank (ECB) ought to accommodate its needs. The right policies are stimulus from the current account countries and the end of extreme austerity in the periphery. Wages should rise in the eurozone core and stabilize in the periphery; they can even rise from their current lows in places like Greece. The 17-nation Eurozone or the 27-nation EU should issue jointly backed bonds to provide social safety net support to the financially weak nations, to raise demand for them and get their economies going, while reducing the extreme financial pain and sacrifice that now jeopardize social stability. As examples, the Greeks voted for extremist parties, the Le Pen party did well in France, and the Tea Party runs amok in the U.S. Austerity fever even grips Washington, which makes the November election especially important.

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