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Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The Hidden Money Funding The Midterms

Reprinted with permission from ProPublica.

By Derek Willis, ProPublica and Maggie Severns, Politico.

Allies of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell used a blind spot in campaign finance laws to undercut a candidate from their own party this year — and their fingerprints remained hidden until the primary was already over.

Super PACs, which can raise and spend unlimited sums of money in elections, are supposed to regularly disclose their funders. But in the case of Mountain Families PAC, Republicans managed to spend $1.3 million against Don Blankenship, a mustachioed former coal baron who was a wild-card candidate for a must-win West Virginia Senate seat, in May without revealing who was supplying the cash.



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Former GOP Mega-Donor Spending Millions To Elect Democrats

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.

The Democratic Party’s war chest is bursting as the midterm cycle unfolds.

One big reason why the party will have so much money on hand as it tries to flip the House and Senate is because a Boston billionaire donor has switched sides from Republican to Democratic.

Mega-donor Seth Klarman used to be one of the GOP’s largest donors. During the Obama years, he ponied up $7 million for the party and its candidates. In 2016, he was the biggest GOP donor in New England, giving millions to the Republican National Committee as well as individuals like Sen.…

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Chief Justice Halts Disclosure Of ‘Dark Money’ Donors

Reprinted with permission from DCReport.

Chief Justice John Roberts halted a federal judge’s order that invalidated a Federal Election Commission regulation that has allowed donors to dark-money groups to be anonymous.

The ruling by U.S. District Court Chief Judge Beryl Howell was supposed to take effect Monday. A three-judge D.C. Circuit panel turned down the same arguments for a stay.

The FEC regulation in dispute requires disclosure only when a donor designates his or her money for a specific independent expenditure, but does not require donors’ identities to be made public under other conditions, including when they seek to support or oppose an individual candidate.…

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