Thursday, February 11, 2016
Submit Stories and Tips

Netanyahu’s Wife Abused Household Staff, Israeli Court Finds

By Jeffrey Heller

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – Benjamin Netanyahu’s wife Sara insulted and raged at household staff, creating an abusive working environment at the Israeli prime minister’s official residence, a labor court ruled on Wednesday.

Allegations of mistreatment leveled by Meni Naftali, a former chief caretaker at the Jerusalem home, were dismissed by the Prime Minister’s Office as “evil, skewed gossip” when the civil lawsuit was filed in 2014.

But the court, in its 40-page decision, said testimony by Naftali and other former household employees about Mrs Netanyahu’s alleged abusive behavior toward them at the Jerusalem residence was credible.

Sara Netanyahu has elicited a multitude of headlines in the past over what family spokesmen have decried as an undeserved reputation for imperiousness, and it seemed unlikely the latest case could cause significant political damage to her husband, now in his fourth term as Israel’s leader.…

Read More

Canada To End Bombing Missions In Iraq And Syria

By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) – Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Monday Canada would pull out six jets that have been bombing targets in Iraq and Syria, ending a controversial combat role in the fight against Islamic State.

Trudeau’s Liberals won an election last October promising to withdraw the jets but came under pressure from allies who feared the decision could weaken efforts to combat the militant group. Bombing began in November 2014 under the previous Conservative government.

“We can’t do everything… we were guided by our desire to do what we could do best to help in the region and to do it in the right way,” Trudeau told a news conference.…

Read More

Can Sitcoms Erase Bigotry?

So it turns out sitcoms can erase bigotry.

That’s the bottom line of a study recently presented before a conference of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. And it doesn’t even have to be a particularly good sitcom.

To judge, at least, from a screening of its first two episodes, the Canadian sitcom on which the study is based was earnest, amiable, and about as funny as “Schindler’s List.” Apparently, however, Canadian television viewers liked it well enough. “Little Mosque on the Prairie,” a culture clash show about life at a Muslim worship house in small town Canada, premiered in 2007 and ran for five years.…

Read More

Menu Title