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Friday, September 30, 2016

Justice Thomas Votes Against The Voting Rights Act

Justice Thomas Votes Against The Voting Rights Act

Justice Thomas VRA

  • Mark Forsyth

    Nothing like an Uncle Tom!

  • whodatbob

    He voted correctly. Make all states equal! Do not give some states a free pass and treat others as though they are orphans.

    • johninPCFL

      Sure. The ones that make SOME citizens wait for hours in line (if they’re dark) while building freeways for others (that are white) should be left alone? Like Texas that recently set up polling in areas around Houston. They reduced the number of polling places from 84 to 12. In a “dark” area? Well your polling place will have 65000 voters today. White area? Well your polling place will have 6700 voters today.

      • whodatbob

        Check who gets served in major Northern cities. It is not poor blacks in the inner city.

        • Sand_Cat

          True enough. The question is, who is doing it (most likely Republicans these days) and what are YOU willing to do about it?

          • whodatbob

            I live in Democratically controlled city. There are no Republican elected officials. It is my fellow liberal Democrats doing it to the poor inner city residents.

          • idamag

            Racism is not a party thing. It is a social injustice. It has nothing to do with parties, until one party notices that the 6th district votes mostly the opposite party and takes steps to suppress the vote in that district.

    • RobertCHastings

      Many of the individual jurisdictions covered under the Voting Rights Act MAY have reformed, while many more that weren’t even covered by it should be, especially after the travesties of the most recent presidential election. The idea of preclearance is not outdated and based upon inaccuracies. It is an idea with a great deal of currency. That voter fraud and intimidation are still alive in many areas of the Deep South is apparent. However, jurisdictions in Ohio and Wisconsin and elsewhere have joined in the push to disenfranchise large numbers of minority voters.
      Thomas has not voted right on anything.

      • whodatbob

        Ohio and Wisconsin will be treated the same as all other states. Discrimination is live a well in the Midwestern State where I live. Difference we in the “North” are not a open as in the South.

        • RobertCHastings

          During the 50’s and 60’s the Deep South made no bones about their treatment of blacks, which involved much more than merely preventing them from voting. I moved to North Carolina when I was sixteen from Central Illinois and was astounded by the treatment of blacks. My senior my HS received it’s “token”, and he was probably the smartest kid in the school, having been especially chosen by the city’s only black HS. 50 years later, that city’s SECOND black mayor has been unanimously approved by the Senate as Obama’s Secretary of Transportation. That signifies a great deal of progress, even though the current state legislature looks like they are trying to undo it all in one year. May God smile favorably on the efforts of the Democratic Party in 2014.

          • idamag

            I knew a Black couple from here. The woman told me this story:
            Her husband was in the service in WWII. He finally was able to get them an apartment in Louisiana and went home to get his wife. They took the Greyhound bus back to Louisiana. Everything was fine until they got to the south. Across three states, they were made to stand and give their seats of white people. Also across those three states they were not allowed to use a restroom or get food. They were fine until they got to the south.

          • RobertCHastings

            Great story and, unfortunately, not uncommon at all. For those blacks who came home from WWII expecting to be welcomed back with open arms, this country must have been a real disappointment.

      • Sand_Cat

        I wish I could feel as optimistic as you seem to be attempting. It would not surprise me if evidence showed NONE of them have reformed, and some have gotten worse.

        • RobertCHastings

          Birmingham, Alabama has GOT to have reformed. We watch “The First 48” on A&E and Birmingham’s entire police force is black. Martin Luther King, Jr. would not recognize their jail. There are even some long-term black Congressmen from the South who were active in the in the Civil Rights Movement, and Julian Bond WAS mayor of Atlanta, all of which says a great deal for a part of the country in which blacks were not allowed to even look whites in the face, let alone vote. However, some places seem to have stolen the mantle once held by Selma, Alabama and pretty much anyplace south of North Carolina. And several of those places are in the North, where escaping slaves from the South would take the Underground Railroad to freedom, places in Ohio, Wisconsin, etc. where voting is STILL problematic for blacks.

          • idamag

            The voting rights act got them elected by people of their own race or it would not have happened.

          • RobertCHastings

            I do not know the precise demographics of Birmingham, but you are right. Blacks who serve in elective office in Birmingham have the support of their fellow blacks; however, as with the Civil Rights movement, blacks had the help of many from the white majority.

        • idamag

          They just went underground.

    • Sand_Cat

      I realize you probably don’t give a damn (or are celebrating the fact), but the Supreme Court’s action pretty much makes sure the bigots can get away with what they want anywhere until Congress (fat chance) passes a new means of selecting states or localities requiring attention. Good news for you, perhaps.
      But while we’re on the topic, I agree the Justice Department should be able to – and should definitely – go after bigots wherever they are when they try to prevent the targets of their hatred from voting. At this point, I’d say that every voting plan everywhere that will affect a Federal election (at least) should require close scrutiny; the bigots aren’t limited to the states cited in the Voting Rights Act; they are merely the worst.

      • whodatbob

        No, I celebrate the fact that the bigots on the north must now be shown to be as hateful as those of the South and now pay for their offences. My family moved form New Orleans to the Midwest in the early 50’s. I went from segregated schools in the south to segregated schools in the Midwest. The suburb we lived in had a law, Negros will be arrested after dark in not accompanied by a white.
        Midwestern bigotry was as deep and strong as southern. Over sixty years the South has changed. Here in the Midwest not so much. The bigotry and hate is a strong as in the South of the fifties.
        It is time for the North to stop point it finger at the South and own up to its sins.

        • idamag

          Since I live in the Northwest, I have never known any interference with minority votes. Yes, we have bigots, but they were never as active nor as rabid as what took place in the south to bring about the voting act.

  • jarheadgene

    Rumor has it …Upon the success of “DJANGO UNCHAINED” ….Samuel L. Jackson will play Clarence Thomas in the movie of his life story. 🙂

    • RobertCHastings

      It should be someone a little whiter, like Al Jolson, or a comedian more suited to the role. Jim Carrey would probably do great, he is terrific at acting the fool, although someone who is ACTUALLY a fool should do it.

      • Sand_Cat

        What do you mean? Certainly the star of “Snakes on a Plane” has the creds necessary to play Thomas, though the producers could probably save money by hiring a stone (or a weasel, which actually turns white part of the year) to play the role.

        • RobertCHastings

          I guess it’s a tossup between someone who does stupid really well, or someone of confused ethnicity.

      • jarheadgene

        Oh darn….I hate having to explain a joke…MY point was that Samuel L. played the “HOUSE N****GA” and he played it well. That is what makes him a shoe in for the Thomas role.

      • RobertCHastings

        Sorry, I have not seen it, although I like Jackson as an actor and as an extremely outspoken individual. Sorry about the “punchline”, it just went way over my head.

  • RobertCHastings

    It is hard to understand how Thomas can destroy something as important to civil rights as the Voting Rights Act, and yet in the same week tear down DOMA, a cornerstone of conservative theology. For someone who has never had an original thought in this life, he is all over the place. It is extremely disheartening that he can so readily ignore the plight of blacks around the country. He will never fill the shoes of Thurgood Marshall.

  • jarheadgene

    Clarence Thomas represents the African American community as a Justice about as much as Alberto Gonzales represented the Latino community as an Atty Gen.
    And who says the G.O.P. is full of racism.???? Just because they happen to
    pick 2 people of color who are about as diverse as “Opie Taylor”.