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Monday, October 24, 2016

According to a Public Policy Polling survey released Tuesday, Senator Mary Landrieu (D-LA) holds a comfortable 10 point lead over U.S. Representative Bill Cassidy (R-LA), the primary challenger in her 2014 re-election race.

The poll finds Landrieu leading a hypothetical head-to-head matchup with Cassidy by 50 to 40 percent, with 10 percent undecided. Landrieu would also hold a 50 to 37 percent lead over Republican Rob Maness, and a 50 to 36 lead over Republican state senator Elbert Guillory.

The results stand in contrast to a Harper Polling survey released Monday, which found Cassidy leading Landrieu 47 to 45 percent, within that poll’s margin of error. Harper Polling is a Republican firm, while Public Policy Polling is Democratic.

The PPP poll finds that Landrieu is fairly popular in the Pelican State. Voters approve of her job performance by a 46 to 43 percent margin; while those numbers are underwhelming in a vacuum, they are solid for a Democrat in a state that Mitt Romney won by 17 points in the 2012 election. Landrieu benefits from solid support among the opposition party; she would win 23 percent of Republicans against Cassidy and Guillory, and 22 percent against Maness, accounting for her leads over all three candidates.

Louisiana uses a nonpartisan “jungle” primary, meaning that all candidates appear on the ballot together, regardless of party affiliation. If no candidate wins a simple majority of votes in the first round of balloting, the top two candidates advance to a runoff election. According to the PPP poll, Landrieu and Cassidy are almost certain to meet in a runoff; with all four candidates on the ballot, Landreiu leads with 47 percent, followed by Cassidy at 20 percent, Guillory at 6 percent, and Maness at 2 percent.

The full results of the PPP poll can be seen here.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

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  • disqus_ivSI3ByGmh

    OK, this is about a 12 point change from the poll published here yesterday. Does anyone have any clue what is going on down there?

    • Independent1

      Polls were taken by different parties. Kind of proves that polls need to be taken with much skepticism as many of them are biased based on which party the poll takers favor. It’s about how the questions are asked and the call list used; and then probably a little judicial fudging of the results.