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Sunday, December 11, 2016

This Week in Health: Losing Sleep Messes Up Your Genes

This Week in Health: Losing Sleep Messes Up Your Genes

“This Week In Health” offers some highlights from the world of health news and wellness tips that you may have missed this week:

  • Just One All-Nighter Can Alter Your Genes: Though the negative effects of sleeplessness have been well documented, a new Swedish study has revealed further damage caused by late nights out. According to the study, a lack of sleep can cause changes to the genes that regulate the body’s circadian rhythms. These changes can alter metabolism, and lead to an increased risk of obesity and diabetes. Full article here.
  • World’s First Malaria Vaccine Takes Another Step Forward: The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has given the vaccine, in development by GlaxoSmithKline, a positive review. Though the vaccine still requires approval from the World Health Organization, the WHO will take the EMA’s recommendation into consideration. The vaccine, approved for use on children aged 6 weeks to 17 months, will be marketed to individual African countries upon WHO approval. Full story here.
  • America’s Calorie Consumption Continues to Shrink: Though one-third of American adults are medically obese, overall American calorie consumption is down by 25 percent since 2003. Calorie consumption had been steadily rising since the 1970s, provoking fears of a possible obesity epidemic and the accompanying rash of health problems. The trend has since peaked, though American waistlines continue to worry the medical profession. Full article here.
  • Doctors Slam Big Pharma For High Cost of Cancer Drugs: 118 oncologists have urged large pharmaceutical firms to make life-saving cancer treatments more affordable. Current treatments cost as much as $30,000 per year—with insurance. The doctors stated that this is prohibitive for middle-class families. A representative from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturing Association responded that cancer treatments require expensive research and development costs, and that the prices reflect those costs. Full story here.

Photo: Charles Williams via Flickr

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