Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.
Sunday, December 11, 2016

Washington (AFP) – The White House warned Congress that passing new sanctions on Iran — even with a delayed launch date — would give Tehran an excuse to undermine an interim nuclear deal.

White House spokesman Jay Carney also warned a bipartisan coalition of senators who are suspicious of the pact reached last month and want to pile up more punishments for Tehran, that their move would be seen as a show of “bad faith” by U.S. partners abroad.

The White House stepped up its rhetorical push to forestall new sanctions amid intense behind-the-scenes lobbying by top Obama administration officials targeting key lawmakers from both Democratic and Republican parties.

“Passing any new sanctions right now will undermine our efforts to achieve a peaceful resolution to this issue by giving the Iranians an excuse to push the terms of the agreement on their side,” Carney said.

“Furthermore, new sanctions are unnecessary right now because our core sanctions architecture remains in place, and the Iranians continue to be under extraordinary pressure.

“If we pass sanctions now, even with the deferred trigger, which has been discussed, the Iranians and likely our international partners will see us as having negotiated in bad faith.”

Carney argued that the passage of new U.S. sanctions — even with a built-in six-month delay contemplated by hawks on Capitol Hill — would threaten the unity of the international coalition that has leveled punishing sanctions on Tehran.

He also said if the interim deal — which freezes aspects of Iran’s nuclear program in return for a slight easing of the sanctions that have crippled the country’s economy — is not translated into a final pact that Iran abides by, the White House would support new sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

Barack Obama’s domestic opponents have seized on the terms of the deal to claim that it enshrines the right of Iran to enrich uranium but the White House late Tuesday issued a statement which sought to clarify the scope of any eventual final nuclear deal with Tehran.

Bernadette Meehan, a National Security Council spokeswoman, said that the United States did not recognize that Iran has “a right to enrich” and that such a right was not included in the deal reached between Iran and six world powers in Geneva last month.

“We are prepared to negotiate a strictly limited enrichment program in the end state, but only because the Iranians have indicated for the first time in a public document that they are prepared to accept rigorous monitoring and limits on scope, capacity, and stockpiles,” she said.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2013 The National Memo