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The 5 Most Deranged Conspiracy Theories From GOP Mega-Donors’ Bizarro Climate Conference

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The 5 Most Deranged Conspiracy Theories From GOP Mega-Donors’ Bizarro Climate Conference

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

Before President Trump even approved the Keystone Pipeline, GOP mega-donors Robert Mercer and Rebekah Mercer were already celebrating with a two-day anti-climate conference sponsored by the conservative Heartland Institute. Among the speakers was British climate denialist Lord Christopher Monckton, who spoke fervently about convincing “illiberals” from Ivanka Trump to Al Gore that climate change is a hoax.

Here are five of his most bizarre theories.

1. The 97 percent ‘consensus‘ that humans are causing climate change is the result of communist influence.

“There isn’t a consensus,” Monckton told the audience. “The people who did the survey reported it as 97 percent because they were communists and they didn’t care about the truth.”

2. A tight-knit crew of Romanian intelligence veterans have taken over the world’s leading mainstream media sources.

Monckton’s war against Pacepa’s disinformation will only be won by forcing Republican Chief Justice Roberts (who has handled many high-profile media cases) to resign.

3. ‘Fake news merchants‘ like Arnold Schwarzenegger can be taken down by boycotting Google.

Monckton is no fan of the Terminator’s warnings about pollution, and has called for his ATTN video to be deleted.

4. An eight-year-old bill that was never voted on is key to bringing down two blue-state congress members. 

The Waxman-Markey Bill (American Clean Energy and Security Act), introduced by Reps Henry A. Waxman (D-CA) and Edward J. Markey (D-MA), is a sore spot for Monckton, despite over 1,000 climate bills having been introduced by Democrats since.

“I have elevated [Waxman and Markey] to the peerage because that means they will have no further influence on politics at all,” said Monckton.

5. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is part of the resistance.

Despite Exxon’s aggressive funding of climate denial for decades, Monckton insisted its former chief executive officer, now Secretary of State, is “at best equivocal on the climate question.”

“My spies inside the administration, who are numerous and devoted, have told me that [Tillerson] is one of the chief foci of resistance to Mr. Trump honoring a promise that he wishes to honor, which is to withdraw forthwith not only from the Paris Climate Agreement but also from the UNFCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change),” he said.

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36 Comments

  1. dbtheonly March 28, 2017

    Aristocrats. Makes you wonder why we got rid of them back in 1776.

    Reply
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      Reply
    2. VirtualPapy March 28, 2017

      Plenty of aristos coming after they repeal the “death tax.”

      Reply
      1. ralphkr March 29, 2017

        The death tax only effects the extremely wealthy who have ineffectual lawyers or inept accountants while it really hits family corporations of relatively modest means.

        Reply
        1. PrecipitousDrop March 30, 2017

          Where do you live that $5 million per person, or $10 million for spouses is “relatively modest means”?

          Reply
          1. ralphkr March 30, 2017

            Currently I live in Washington, PrecipiousDrop, and previously in AK, CA,SD and anyone who thinks $10 million is not modest is someone who does not realize that true wealth does not begin until measured in Billions. Over in Seattle Gates has $90 Billion, Bezos $76 Billion, Ballmer$24 Billion, Allen,$17 Billion. Now that is true wealth and you can bet that they have paid lawyers a small fortune to make sure their is no tax on their estate just like the DuPont and Rockefeller families have done..

            I have seen families nearly bankrupted by the so called death taxes because they were not rich enough to pay lawyers and politicians to arrange their estate to avoid taxes and had to sell off their holdings at fire sale prices to cover the tax. For instance. one of my neighbors owns some car dealerships (Toyota, Honda, VW, Nissan, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep),a fair size ranch, and some smaller businesses and almost all his heirs work in the family business BUT when he dies there won’t be enough cash available to cover the tax since his money is tied up in businesses & property.

            Reply
          2. PrecipitousDrop March 30, 2017

            Oh.
            You refer to the top 5% of US citizens, or those earning $250,000/yr or more. I’m one of the 95% of US citizens who earn less than that.
            Your car dealer/rancher “friend” has fed you a line of bull. There are dozens of ways for him to eliminate any estate tax liability; he just needs to make the hard choices required to do so. In the meantime, most people in his position purchase term life insurance for the specific purpose of paying the estimated estate tax if he dies before he can put his affairs in order.

            Reply
          3. dbtheonly March 30, 2017

            PD, it really goes to show that wealth is a comparative rather than a definitive term. The wealthy are those with more money than me. I’m middle clsss.

            Reply
          4. PrecipitousDrop March 30, 2017

            I like to think that I’ve been a solidly “middle class” provider as well. Mrs. Drop has always said, “Prosperity is not having what you want, it’s wanting what you have.”
            Marrying her is the best thing I’ve ever done.

            Reply
          5. dbtheonly March 30, 2017

            I’d heard that as the definition of happiness; but would never disagree with Mrs. D.

            Also suggest Russian short story, “How Much Land Does a Man Need?” Big influence on the youthful b.

            Wouldn’t disagree about your best move either.

            Reply
          6. ralphkr March 30, 2017

            Actually, PD, the folks I named in the Seattle area are in the top 0.01% of US citizens.earnings.

            It is true that the wealthy businessman that I used as an example COULD set things up so the death tax is covered. The easiest way would be to sell some of his current holdings, which triggers taxes, and set aside enough cash to cover the death tax so his heirs would not be forced into emergency sales. Of course, any business that he sells then reduces his current income and puts some of his family out of jobs.I have always considered life insurance a zero sum game.

            The death tax situation is just like the business/corporate tax situation. The truly wealthy pay no taxes because they can afford to buy Congressmen to pass special exemptions for them (GE, WF, & others made billions paid no Fed taxes) while those who are in the lower tier and making over $100K pay over 39%.

            Reply
    3. ralphkr March 29, 2017

      But, dbtheonly, our founding fathers were the aristocrats of the day.

      Reply
      1. dbtheonly March 29, 2017

        Hardly.

        They were successful, no doubt, but no inherited titles or vast wealth here. Washington was a successful surveyor and explorer. He married wealth. Hamilton was illegitimate. Franklin a successful writer and publisher. Adams a successful lawyer.

        They founded a Republic and specifically disclaimed titles of nobility. Except Adams who was granted the title “His Rotundity”.

        Reply
        1. ralphkr March 29, 2017

          You seem to have conflated “Aristocrats” with “Royalty”, db. The leaders of our Revolution were definitely a combination of aristocrats and criminals attempting to escape prosecution.

          Reply
          1. dbtheonly March 29, 2017

            You’re confusing aristocrat with successful. Although royalty is just the super-size aristocracy. Aristocracy requires inheritance and none of the Founding Fathers inherited vast wealth. In fact, vast wealth simply wasn’t available in the Colonies or early America.

            Founding Fathers criminals attempting to escape prosecution? I mean aside from treason, which rather has it backward anyhow. Who? Washington, Adams, Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson?

            Reply
          2. ralphkr March 29, 2017

            No, db, Royal are not royal because they are rich but because they inherited a title. In fact, many of Royal birth are close to bankrupt in today’s world. Most of the instigators of the American Revolution were the aristocrats of their time. By the way, Washington did inherit a vast fortune before he married into even more wealth.

            Adams was an embezzler, Hancock (inherited vast wealth and was the wealthiest man in Massachusetts) was smuggler (smuggling was the true national industry until after the Revolution), Jefferson avoided paying his debts to English merchants via the Revolution (thereby avoiding debtors prison) but still succeed in dying in debt to the tune of $10 million modern dollars,Hamilton was definitely the most honest as well as the smartest of the founding fathers, Franklin was a wealthy aristocrat & early version of today’s jet-set playboy spending much of his time in France wooing various females of royal & other persuasion.

            You really should discard those history books designed for second graders and consider reading some written for adults such as those by the Durants.

            Reply
          3. dbtheonly March 30, 2017

            Snort of derision. Defining terms in relation to their outcome is a RW troll game. Though I guess it’d work for left wing trolls as well.

            You really can’t have it both ways. Hancock is an aristocrat or he’s a smuggler. Not both.

            I will point out that if the Trump Tariff is imposed, smuggling will return to its former profitability. Call Hancock a resister.

            Just for it, the Durants, plural, were writing philosophy, not history. There are multiple popular biographies available. McCollough on Adams. Flexnor on Washington.

            Reply
  2. Lynda Groom March 28, 2017

    Lord Monckton has been coco for cocoa puffs for a very long time. Any organization that depends upon that crank has obviously left the scientific station long ago.

    Reply
  3. Aaron_of_Portsmouth March 28, 2017

    Another graphic example of excessive greed’s effect on the brain, let alone the effects to be incurred by letting science luddites to be given the right to utter non-science nonsense.
    Britain and America each have some genetic commonalities when it comes to an inability to accept facts. BREXIT and TRUMPism are tumors which have been exposed. Is it too late to surgical remove these influences?

    Reply
  4. Aaron_of_Portsmouth March 28, 2017

    The GOP and its supporters stand alone, along with the likes of Monckton of the UK, in standing alone as the most mentally deficient individuals on the planet when it comes to science. Even those who have science backgrounds have their brains scrambled when exposed to the ideology and gospel of greed being preached so loudly and persistently by the GOP. The conservative attitudes expressed in the film “Inherit the Wind” are being repeated by Trump and the GOP, with the latter reprising the roles of the two main antagonists in the Scopes Monkey Trial. We certainly have a lot of “monkeys” doing their best to defeat Science—a blasphemy akin to other affronts against humanity. Might Trump, the GOP, and the nuts at this philistine conference, be convicted posthumously as “Criminals Against Humankind”?

    Is there something I missed in the Bible that says it’s acceptable to reject science and clear evidence, when jobs and making profit are in the conversation? Or has the GOP fashioned a new Religion, Christian on the veneer, but something altogether different on the inside, impelling them to abandon commonsense and reason??

    Someone please point out for me, where in the Bible is the GOP’s inordinate appetite for wealth sanctioned. Maybe the “InformedVoter”, Patrick, Alain Vercommen Granjean, or similar lightweights, can show me the passages.

    Reply
    1. dbtheonly March 28, 2017

      As I understand the Bible, money is, at best, an irrelevancy, and, at worst, an active hindrance of our spiritual journey. The Apostles appear to have ignored it except for the ability to help the needy.

      I’ve often felt that I ought to just give away everything saved for retirement and just trust God. Abandon all material possessions. But I just can’t bring myself to do it.

      You remember me telling you that sin is knowing what God wants you to do and ignoring Him? Yeah.

      Reply
      1. PrecipitousDrop March 28, 2017

        Good people, no matter their religion, retain savings to responsibly address unforeseeable misfortune and the certain costs of eventual death and funerary costs. They write a will to distribute any excess when they no longer live — when they no longer pose the risk to others of becoming indigent.
        If you don’t already, spend what you can on those who need it while you’re alive to make choices. Pay off a Walmart’s holiday layaway shelves. Give a poor school an office supply gift card. Pay a local barber or salon to give free haircuts to job seekers. Be generous with the use of your vehicles or real estate. Then, make careful plans for the day you never return and can’t take it with you.

        Reply
        1. dbtheonly March 29, 2017

          Wise advice PD. My problem comes in that there is always more to do.

          My personal charities are the local homeless shelter and soup kitchen. I try to leave a bag of onions, celery, and carrots with them each week.

          And I don’t take the deduction on my taxes. Always thought that was a cheap scam, getting money back for giving to charity. Kinda defeats the whole purpose of giving, doesn’t it?

          Flagged the spam above for you.

          Reply
          1. PrecipitousDrop March 29, 2017

            Of course there is always more to do. Not even the Nazarene could heal us all.
            Take the tax deduction, DB. Use your refund to do more for them. More carrots. Maybe some soap, or toothbrushes. Let IRS rules work to their advantage. Just sayin’…
            And thanks for the pennant.
            You have a good heart. Thanks for your kindness.

            Reply
      2. Aaron_of_Portsmouth March 28, 2017

        Right you are. Although money is a necessity, and was never eschewed, according to what I get from reading about the recordings of what Jesus said, His issue and focus was the abuse of money, warning implicitly not to place overemphasis on it, but to gain money in the proper manner.

        As we see in our society, we’ve lost our equilibrium regarding money.

        And sin wouldn’t be attributed to anyone who was never made aware of what was forbidden, which is why every people has had their own Messenger sent to them—many of whom we have no record of in writing, but logic and the necessity to have standards for proper behavior, what to avoid and what is lawful, requires a Teacher.

        As for those who know what is wrong and act otherwise, that is when sin is committed.

        Reply
  5. PrecipitousDrop March 28, 2017

    High muckety-mucks in the United States have always envied royalty. The wealthier they are, the more they crave hereditary deference.
    It’s not surprising this nutty enclave would — breathlessly, no doubt — trot out a real, live Lord!
    Poor saps.

    Reply
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      Reply
      1. vile spammer.
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        flag it, please

        Reply
    2. FireBaron March 29, 2017

      Monckton is one of the reasons Parliament reorganized Lords so not every bozo who inherited a title has a right to a seat anymore. Outside of “Life Peers” (i.e. those whose patents expire on their death) and CoE Archbishops, Members of the Peerage get to select a certain number of themselves to actually get a seat in Lords. Thanks to their infinite wisdom, Monckton was not selected as one, even for the at-times-needed comic relief.

      Reply
  6. Independent1 March 28, 2017

    How could anyone read/view the following article from the National Geographic and claim that climate change is a hoax?

    The Big Thaw
    An excerpt: When President Taft created Glacier National Park in 1910, it was home to an estimated 150 glaciers. Since then the number has decreased to fewer than 30, and most of those remaining have shrunk in area by two-thirds. Fagre predicts that within 30 years most if not all of the park’s namesake glaciers will disappear.

    “Things that normally happen in geologic time are happening during the span of a human lifetime,” says Fagre. “It’s like watching the Statue of Liberty melt.”

    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/big-thaw/

    What possible rational could people like Robert & Rebekah Mercer and other climate change deniers come up with to explain away the melting of 120 glaciers in Glacier National Park in less than 125 years which before mankind began the industrial revolution hadn’t melted away in the previous 5,000 years?

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/734480420f8b635cdaf0e9d6e085e56af5a044eaf5acb77828025109cfe69e29.jpg

    Meltwater gushes from an ice cap on the island of Nordaustlandet, in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago.

    Reply
    1. FireBaron March 29, 2017

      But some boneheaded GOP Senator brought a snowball into the Chamber and threw it to prove Climate Change and Global Warning was a hoax. Then again, this was the same Senator who declaimed that science in general was nothing but lies straight from the pit of Hell.

      Reply
      1. Independent1 March 29, 2017

        But was he aware that 120 glaciers in Glacier National Park had melted away in just 107 years? Glaciers that had not melted away over numerous previous millennia? Melted away with no help but from man-made global warming?

        Reply
  7. Dominick Vila March 29, 2017

    What is happening in the USA is not only incredible, it is embarrassing. At a time when our polar caps and glaciers are melting at an unprecedented rate, when shipping lanes via the North Pole are becoming a reality, when droughts are devastating countries that once upon a time were self-sufficient, at a time when most countries, especially China, are investing large amounts of money on alternative energy sources to reduce pollution and carbon emissions, and at a time when 194 nations signed the Paris Accord on Climate Change a number of American demagogues and greedy businessmen have decided to put our country, and the rest of the world, at risk by seeking energy independence by refocusing on fossil fuels, coal mining, and a return to the good ole days to make a buck. Many of us will not feel the effects of what is taking place in the USA today, but our children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren certainly will. I wonder what they will think of us for allowing this to happen.

    Reply
    1. Independent1 March 29, 2017

      All rational points which any person with a normal functioning brain should be able to grasp; which only heightens the evidence that the majority of today’s Republicans do not have normal functioning brains. They don’t even have empathy for their own descendants.

      Reply
  8. Dhusk March 29, 2017

    Definitive proof against that old GOP saw that having a lot of money is a sign of superior intelligence.

    Reply

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