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Thursday, March 23, 2017

The New Alien Exclusion Act

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When you have so many immigrants being admitted, they tend to cluster together, they tend to maybe be a bit more slow in learning the English language, to becoming acculturated, to becoming patriotic Americans,” Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) told NPR reporter John Burnett in early February.

Smith has been a genteel nativist for decades, but the content of his character came into sharper focus in 2010 when his selection to chair the House Judiciary Committee raised the visibility of his anti-immigrant, and more specifically anti-Latino, legislation.

That year Smith put together an anti-immigrant trifecta that included: a “show-your-papers” bill that would have made ethnicity probable cause for state and local police to demand proof of citizenship or legal residency; an anchor-baby bill that would have excluded the children of immigrants from the promise of the Fourteenth Amendment, which says “all persons born or naturalized in the United States .



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On Health Reform, Democrats And Republicans Don’t Speak The Same Language

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Turns out that Democrats have more to say than Republicans when it comes to legislation that would repeal major parts of the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.

With the House set to vote today on the Republican replacement plan, called the American Health Care Act, we decided to look at the messages coming from members of both parties.

A ProPublica review of 576 press releases posted on the websites of representatives and senators since Jan. 20 found that a higher proportion of Democrats have released statements criticizing the GOP bill than Republicans have backing it.

Though Republicans control both houses of Congress, many have stayed silent, at least on their websites.



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Is The Big Republican Attack On Our Health Care Doomed To Fail?

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Thursday’s House action on repealing Obamacare—how the GOP majority votes, or if they postpone—will be a defining moment for the Trump presidency and Congress.

As Wednesday closed, vote counters in the capital, such as TheHill.com, listed 25 Republican representatives publicly saying they would vote no. House Freedom Caucus leaders, whose members are not satisfied with spending cuts depriving 14 million people of health insurance in 2018 and jacking up everyone else’s premiums by 20 percent according to the Congressional Budget Office’s analysis, told Politico.com that they had even more no votes. The Republicans can’t have more than 22 defections for the bill to pass.



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