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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Senator John McCain, the Republican presidential nominee in 2008, joined 2012 nominee Mitt Romney on Thursday in criticizing front-runner Donald Trump, particularly on foreign policy.

“I share the concerns about Donald Trump that my friend and former Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, described in his speech today,” McCain said in a statement.

“I would also echo the many concerns about Mr. Trump’s uninformed and indeed dangerous statements on national security issues that have been raised by 65 Republican defense and foreign policy leaders,” he said of the letter, published online.

McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said at a time of global turmoil, “I want Republican voters to pay close attention to what our party’s most respected and knowledgeable leaders and national security experts are saying about Mr. Trump.”

(Reporting by Steve Holland; Editing by Susan Heavey)

Photo: U.S. Senator John McCain arrives on a visit at a migrant center near the village of Adasevci, Serbia February 12, 2016. REUTERS/Marko Djurica

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

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