Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

On Thursday, deceptively edited videos of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) meant to cast doubt on her competency made the rounds on social media and right-wing websites. Later, Fox put its weight behind the narrative, and the network’s most prominent viewer, President Donald Trump, tweeted out a Fox clip about it.

The smears seem like an obvious attempt to discredit Pelosi after she questioned Trump’s fitness for office during a May 23 press conference, saying she wished “his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.” A day earlier, Pelosi had made the true statement that Trump was engaged in a cover-up. As CNN’s Brian Stelter pointed out in the May 24 edition of his Reliable Sources newsletter, “What’s going on here is pretty obvious. Pelosi is questioning President Trump’s competency — saying she’s concerned about the president’s well-being, suggesting an ‘intervention’ is needed — so Trump’s allies are saying the exact same things about her.”

There are actually two videos circulating in the pro-Trump media sphere. One spliced together clips of Pelosi’s comments on Thursday to make it seem like she stammered throughout the press conference. The other significantly slowed remarks Pelosi made during an appearance at the Center for American Progress (CAP) on May 22 to make her look inebriated. (Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani tweeted and later deleted that manipulated video.)

Conspiracy theory website Infowars pushed the narrative with the headline “Watch Nancy Pelosi Stutter Slur And Suffer Memory Lapses in Press Conference.” Then Fox Business’ Lou Dobbs Tonight adopted a similar frame in an on-screen chyron and aired the deceptively spliced clip of the May 23 press conference. Trump then tweeted the Fox segment out to his 60.5 million followers.

Copies of the videos continue to spread on social media platforms like FacebookRedditand Twitter, garnering thousands of interactions. Though these videos are deceptive, the tech giants seem unable to halt their spread — and in some cases, they may even be making money from views, as at least one video pushingthe smear on YouTube featured an ad.

Indiana I-69 Corridor Project; Section 6; Morgan/Johnson/Marion counties

Photo credit: ITB495

This article was produced by the Independent Media Institute.

Rich Carmona spent decades upgrading his 1970s ranch home in Midland, Michigan.

He lovingly installed new flooring and doors and remodeled the bathrooms. After finishing the kitchen 18 months ago, he finally had the house the way he liked it.

Then the 96-year-old Edenville Dam failed amid heavy rains May 19, unleashing a torrent of water that drowned roads, swept some houses off of their foundations and left others, including Carmona's, in ruins.

Keep reading... Show less