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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Much is said about the venerable warhorse known as Microsoft Office, but it’s still the most popular productivity suite on the planet for a reason. While you may feel you’ve got a grasp on Office’s most popular offerings like Word or Outlook, there are likely a few components of the Office package you haven’t used often.

You can get more Office-proficient today with this Ultimate Microsoft Office CPD Certification Bundle, now just $39 in The National Memo Store. You’ll get access to 12 courses, focusing on both the popular and lesser-known apps in the Office arsenal.

Your courses include:

  • Excel for Beginners – a $166 value
  • Excel Intermediate – a $166 value
  • Excel Advanced – a $166 value
  • Word for Beginners – a $166 value
  • Word for Beginners – a $166 value
  • PowerPoint for Beginners – a $166 value
  • OneDrive – a $166 value
  • OneNote – a $166 value
  • Calendar – a $166 value
  • Visio – a $166 value
  • Access – a $166 value
  • Outlook – a $166 value

With the above courses completed, you’ll understand spreadsheets, multimedia presentations, database management and more like the back of your hand. Plus, the added benefit of certifications gives you a leg up in your next job interview. These courses normally cost almost $2,000, so score this package now at over 90% off, just $39 before the deal expires.

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