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According to a new Gallup poll, the number of Americans who have confidence in Congress has hit an all-time low — making the 113th Congress the least-trusted American institution on record.

The poll finds that just 10 percent of Americans have confidence in Congress, down 3 percent from 2012, and capping a long-term trend dating back to the 1970s.
Confidence in Congress Since 1973

According to Gallup, that 10 percent rating is the lowest for any institution it has measured since 1973.

Perhaps because of Congress’ divided leadership, disgust with the legislative branch is a very bipartisan phenomenon. Democrats, Republicans, and Independents all rate Congress nearly equally.
Partisan Breakdown

 

Congress’ dismal 10 percent confidence rating puts it at the bottom of the list of institutions that Gallup tests.
Institution list

Health Maintenance Organizations are the only institution that even approaches Congress’ terrible numbers, but even they aren’t as mistrusted — 31 percent say that they have “little or no confidence” in HMOs, compared with a startling 52 percent who say the same about Congress.

The numbers don’t come as a major surprise, given the institution’s downward trend on the question over the past 40 years, and the current Congress’ general ineffectiveness. Congress’ approval rating is equally abysmal; Gallup’s most recent poll found that 78 percent of Americans disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job.

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