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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Another big Democrat is “Ready for Hillary.”

General Wesley Clark has joined James Carville and Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO) in saying they’re hoping former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will run for president in 2016.

“When Hillary Clinton took over as Secretary of State, America’s image around the globe was badly damaged,” Clark writes in an email to Democrats. “Since then, we’ve ended the war in Iraq. We’re winding down in Afghanistan. We decimated al Qaeda’s leadership, and helped democracy grow in the Middle East.”

The general led NATO under President Clinton and has been a longtime supporter of the Clintons. The ad above in 2008 firmed up the former First Lady’s foreign policy credentials, which were questioned before she became one of the nation’s most popular chief diplomats.

“Supporting Hillary is an easy decision for me,” he said. “I know she’ll steer us straight at home and represent us right abroad. We all know that Hillary would make the best president for our country.”

Mrs. Clinton made news herself last week by saying that she really hopes there is a female president soon.

“Let me say this, hypothetically speaking, I really do hope that we have a woman president in my lifetime,” she said at a conference focused on women’s issues in Toronto. “And whether it’s next time or the next time after that, it really depends on women stepping up and subjecting themselves to the political process, which is very difficult.”

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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