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Miami (AFP) — Support for legalizing medical marijuana in Florida gathered steam ahead of a November referendum, with a poll out Monday showing 88 percent in favor of the measure.

Only 10 percent of residents opposed legalization, the survey by Quinnipiac University found.

Floridians across all age ranges and genders, as well as both Democrats and Republicans, polled more in favor than against legalization, it said.

Florida took a preliminary step in that direction in May when the state legislature allowed a variety of marijuana called “Charlotte’s web,” which contains a minimal amount of the drug’s main psychoactive substance, to be used to treat diseases like epilepsy and cancer.

Marijuana for medical uses is allowed in 23 of 50 U.S. states as well as the District of Columbia, while Colorado and Washington states have authorized recreational use of the drug.

The Quinnipiac survey also found that 55 percent of Floridians were in favor of “allowing adults in Florida to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use,” while 41 percent were against it.

A total of 1,251 people were surveyed between July 17-21 for the poll, which has a margin of error of 2.8 percent.

AFP Photo/Frederic J. Brown

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Amy Coney Barrett

Photo from Fox 45 Baltimore/ Facebook

Donald Trump will select U.S. Appeals Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his Supreme Court pick Saturday, multiple news outlets confirmed with White House officials on Friday — and the outlook couldn't be more bleak for reproductive rights, LGBTQ rights, immigration, and the future of health care in the United States.

According to the New York Times, Trump "will try to force Senate confirmation before Election Day."

"The president met with Judge Barrett at the White House this week and came away impressed with a jurist that leading conservatives told him would be a female Antonin Scalia," the Times reported.

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