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WASHINGTON (AFP) – President Barack Obama on Wednesday mourned the lives lost 12 years ago in the September 11, 2001 attacks, saying “our hearts still ache” for the nearly 3,000 people killed.

Against the backdrop of possible U.S. military action against Syria, Obama marked the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks first at the White House, and then at a solemn Pentagon ceremony attended by families of 9/11 victims and senior officers.

“We pray for the memory of all those taken from us — nearly 3,000 innocent souls,” Obama said.

“Our hearts still ache for the futures snatched away, the lives that might have been,” he said.

“They left this Earth. They slipped from our grasp.”

Quoting the Bible, Obama spoke of “the miracle of restoration,” paying tribute to the resilient spirit of victims’ families, saying he was “amazed at the will that you’ve summoned in your lives to lift yourselves up and to carry on.”

American troops invaded Afghanistan shortly after the 9/11 attacks to oust the Taliban for giving refuge to Al-Qaeda, and Obama gave thanks to the American forces who served there — but said the war was now coming to a close.

He said the country would remain vigilant in the face of future terror threats but said military might alone could not bring peace and security.

“Let us have the wisdom to know that while force is at times necessary, force alone cannot build the world we seek,” he said.

Nearly 3,000 people were killed in the 2001 attacks in New York, Washington and Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

At the Pentagon, 184 died when a hijacked airliner struck the building.

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

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