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President Barack Obama’s “Plan B” for education reform, which would free states from No Child Left Behind requirements if they can prove they’re making progress, is coming under fire from Rep. George Miller (D-Calif.), the ranking member of the House Education and Labor Committee .

President Obama called on Congress to pass an education overhaul bill by the start of the next school year — two months away. If they don’t, his backup plan will go into effect; Miller has openly wondered if the backup plan is an “escape route” for Congress and the White House to take an extended break, while others, such as former Bush Administration Education Secretary Margaret Spellings has worried that it gives states too much freedom.

“I’m skeptical that less accountability equals better results. Why? Because we tried it for 40 years. It didn’t work,” she said. (Nor, Miller would argue, does a long vacation where nothing gets done.) [The Washington Times]

 

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Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

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Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

When iconoclasts topple Jefferson, they seem to validate the argument advanced by defenders of Confederate monuments that there is no escape from the slippery slope. "First, they come for Nathan Bedford Forrest and then for Robert E. Lee. Where does it end? Is Jefferson next? Is George Washington?"

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