The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times

A deadly fire that burned through several square miles near Guthrie, Oklahoma, and destroyed at least six homes was substantially contained Monday morning, but fire officials said they were worried that hot, dry and windy weather could cause the blaze to resume its dangerous march.

Some of the roughly 1,000 people who were evacuated on Sunday were allowed to return to the southern area of the fire, Guthrie Fire Chief Eric Harlow told the Los Angeles Times on Monday. But problems could still arise in the northern section because of the dry and windy weather forecast.

The wildfire is contained “for the most part,” about 75 percent, Harlow said. “I don’t trust that north side,” he said. “But we’re optimistic and hoping for the best.”

The blaze claimed one life, a 56-year-old man who refused to leave his home on Sunday. One firefighter sustained heat exhaustion and a resident had minor burns, the chief said.

The fire is burning through about 3,500 acres in an area about 5.5 miles long and about 1.5 miles at its widest, Harlow said.

“It isn’t traveling,” battalion chief Rob Bukofzer told The Times. “There are still multiple fires burning.”

The blaze is expected to burn for several days, he said.

The wildfire broke out about 4 p.m. when a controlled burn got out of hand in the area, about 35 miles north of Oklahoma City.

The National Weather Service predicted a high temperature of 100 degrees in Guthrie on Monday, with winds gusting up to 31 mph.

Photo: Tim Evanson via Flickr

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}