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Photo by The White House

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump says he is allowing Microsoft to purchase the U.S. assets of the popular Beijing-based TikTok social media video sharing app, in a sale Trump personally is forcing.

In discussing what he sees as the broad portions of an agreement the President used a real estate term to openly solicit the payment that would have to be made to the U.S. Treasury.


"I said a very substantial portion of that price is going to have to come into the U.S. Treasury of the United States, because we're making it possible for this deal to happen," Trump told reporters Monday afternoon.

"Now they don't have any rights, unless we give it to them," Trump continued. "If we're going to give them the rights then it has to come into this country, it's a little like the landlord-tenant. Without a lease, the tenant has nothing, so they pay what's called 'key money' or they pay something, but the United States should be reimbursed."

Trump is actively forcing the sale of a foreign-owned company, after announcing he would ban it over the weekend. And now that he's forcing the sale, he's saying the U.S. should get a "substantial" cut from the sale of the company – or he will not allow it to go through.

In some states and certain situations, "key money" is illegal.

It is not known if any other U.S. company purchasing a foreign asset or company was ever required to pay what effectively sounds like a bribe.

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Terry McAuliffe

Reprinted with permission from PressRun

Sticking close to the media's preferred script, Axios this week reported that the walls were caving in on Democrat Terry McAuliffe, who's caught in a surprisingly close race in Virginia's governor's race. "It was clear the McAuliffe campaign has taken on an air of tension — bordering on panic," Axios announced.

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Terry McAuliffe

This article was produced by Voting Booth, a project of the Independent Media Institute.

After 2020's election, Virginia adopted more pro-voter legislation than any state, from expanding access to starting to amend its constitution to enshrine voting rights. But these reforms have not been enough to turn out voters in this fall's statewide elections, where the top-of-the-ticket Democratic and Republican candidates for governor are close in polls but seen as underwhelming.

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