The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

In March of 2017, President Donald Trump instructed Attorney General Jeff Sessions that he should continue to oversee the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and potential collusion with the Trump campaign, despite Sessions’ recusal on the advice of Justice Department lawyers, according to a new report from the New York Times. Trump reportedly sought to control the investigation that has since led to guilty pleas and indictments from several of his top aides.

“If you don’t think this is obstruction of justice, I can’t help you,” said Republican columnist Rick Wilson of the new report.

Sessions recused himself from the Russia probe, and any other investigations touching on the campaign, because of his involvement as a surrogate for Trump. The Times notes that experts in conflict of interest regulations say there is no precedent for overturning or withdrawing a recusal in any similar case.

Don’t let big tech control what news you see. Get more stories like this in your inbox, every day.

“If Trump has nothing to hide, why does he act as if he has everything to hide?” asked New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof.

During the campaign, Trump and Sessions were close allies. Since the attorney general’s recusal, however, the relationship has soured.

Previous reporting found that Trump had attempted to fire Sessions, presumably so that he would be able to appoint a new attorney general to control the Russia probe. Trump also reportedly asked White House counsel Don McGahn to get Sessions to reverse his recusal himself from the investigation, but McGahn backed off when Sessions explained that the recusal was based on the recommendation of Justice Department lawyers.

The Times has previously reported that special counsel Robert Mueller, who currently is in charge of the investigation, wants to ask Trump about his attempts to interfere with Sessions’ recusal decision.

Cody Fenwick is a reporter and editor. Follow him on Twitter @codytfenwick.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

As the nation's political press obsesses over the fate of the administration's Build Back Better proposal, nothing less than the ultimate success or failure of Joe Biden's presidency is said to be at stake. And yet here's the great paradox: taken separately, the elements of the Democrats' social spending proposals poll extremely well.

According to a recent CBS News poll, support for federal funding to reduce prescription drug prices is favored by 88 percent of American voters. Adding Medicare coverage of dental, eye and hearing polls at 84 percent. Another 73 percent back expanding paid family and medical leave. And 67 percent think that universal pre-kindergarten programs for three and four year olds are a good idea.

Keep reading... Show less

Dr. Anthony Fauci

By Humeyra Pamuk

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Vaccines for kids between the ages of 5 and 11 will likely be available in the first half of November, top U.S. infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said on Sunday, predicting a timetable that could see many kids getting fully vaccinated before the end of the year.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}