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Trump Takes No Responsibility For 'Disinfectant' Controversy | The 11th Hour | MSNBC

Donald Trump once again refused to take responsibility for his own actions, saying at a news conference on Monday that if someone died from using disinfectant it would not be his fault.

Trump's comments came after a reporter told him that some states have seen spikes in people calling poison control after using disinfectant.

Trump floated the idea on Thursday of using disinfectant — which can be deadly if ingested in any way by human beings — to cure COVID-19 disease.

"Maryland and other states, Gov. Larry Hogan specifically said, they've seen a spike in people using disinfectant after your comments last week. I know you said they were sarcastic, but do you take any responsibility if someone were to die?" a reporter asked Trump.

This is not the first time Trump has refused to take responsibility for something.

In early March, when the virus was taking hold in the United States, Trump said it was not his fault that there was a lack of testing to identify and isolate people who had the virus, which experts said could have slowed the spread.

"No, I don't take responsibility at all because we were given a set of circumstances, and we were given rules, regulations, and specifications from a different time," Trump said on March 13 about the testing shortage, appearing to try to lay blame on past administrations.

However, COVID-19 is a disease caused by a novel coronavirus — meaning the virus is new and has never been seen before. Past administrations did not make tests for this virus because it hadn't existed yet.Trump responded emphatically that it is not his fault.

"No, I don't. No, I can't imagine — I can't imagine that," Trump said, before moving on to the next question.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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