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Talking Points Memo has shared a remarkable video of Mitt Romney — long derided for changing his positions on abortion, the auto bailout, and health care reform, among other issues — attacking then-Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry for being a flip-flopper at the 2004 Republican Convention.

Romney’s speech can be seen below:

In the video, Romney gives us what may be a glimpse into his own psyche when he tries to explain what caused Kerry to change his positions:

“For those who don’t understand how he can be so vacillating, it stems from that fact that he’s very conflicted, that he is drawn in two different directions very powerfully,” Romney said. “If he’s with an audience, he wants to identify with and satisfy that audience, and will say what he thinks they want to hear. And if that audience, for instance, is on one side of an issue he’ll follow that, on another, he’ll follow another.”

The DNC — which has released two ads attacking Romney in the past two weeks — is likely chomping at the bit in anticipation of turning this video of the pot calling the kettle black against the former Massachusetts governor.

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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