The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

One might think that by now, Republicans would have learned that the Sununu family makes awful campaign surrogates. But they keep falling into the same trap that infamously ensnared Mitt Romney.

New Hampshire Senate candidate Scott Brown is the latest victim. Brown, who represented Massachusetts in the Senate for three years, has faced repeated accusations of carpetbagging throughout the campaign. So he couldn’t have been thrilled to hear New Hampshire executive councilor Chris Sununu introduce him at an event on Monday by telling the crowd that he’s not “a phony from Massachusetts,” but “a phony from New Hampshire.”

The video was captured by a tracker from the liberal American Bridge PAC, which has followed Brown assiduously throughout the campaign (even stalking him in a canoe last week). Brown has rewarded those monitoring his events with several gaffes, including repeatedly forgetting which state he’s in, and once hiding in a bathroom to avoid answering questions about his opinion on the Hobby Lobby ruling.

Despite his missteps, Brown appears to be gaining ground in the polls. But he still trails incumbent Democratic senator Jeanne Shaheen by 6 percent, according to the Huffington Post’s poll average.

Photo: Newington NH via Flickr

Want more political news and analysis? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Pro-Trump GETTR Becoming 'Safe Haven' For Terrorist Propaganda

Photo by Thomas Hawk is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Just weeks after former President Trump's team quietly launched the alternative to "social media monopolies," GETTR is being used to promote terrorist propaganda from supporters of the Islamic State, a Politico analysis found.

The publication reports that the jihadi-related material circulating on the social platform includes "graphic videos of beheadings, viral memes that promote violence against the West and even memes of a militant executing Trump in an orange jumpsuit similar to those used in Guantanamo Bay."

Keep reading... Show less

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although QAnon isn't a religious movement per se, the far-right conspiracy theorists have enjoyed some of their strongest support from white evangelicals — who share their adoration of former President Donald Trump. And polling research from The Economist and YouGov shows that among those who are religious, White evangelicals are the most QAnon-friendly.

Keep reading... Show less
x

Close