The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

dpa

PARIS — French actress Julie Gayet whose affair with President Francois Hollande caused a sensation earlier this year won a second court case Tuesday against the gossip magazine that revealed their liaison.

A criminal court in Nanterre west of Paris ruled that a picture of published by Closer magazine of Gayet in her car was a violation of her privacy and handed the magazine’s editor and the photographer who took the image suspended fines, French radio reported.

The picture appeared in Closer‘s January 17 edition, a week after the paper first revealed the liaison between the 60-year-old president and 42-year-old actress.

In France, taking a person’s photograph in a private place without their consent is an offense punishable by up to a year in prison and a fine of 45,000 euros (59,000 dollars).

Gayet successfully argued that her car was a private place.

The ruling is the second against Closer over the affair.

In a civil case in March, the magazine was ordered to pay Gayet 15,000 euros in damages over an earlier set of pictures showing her and Hollande arriving separately at a Paris apartment they allegedly used for trysts.

The pictures led to Hollande’s split from his partner of several years, journalist Valerie Trierweiler.

Trierweiler, 49, is bringing out a book on Thursday on her year-and-a-half stint as first lady, France Info radio reported Tuesday.

The book’s release was confirmed to the radio by Les Arenes publishing company.

A journalist for the parliamentary channel LCP tweeted that the account was entitled “Merci pour le moment” (Thanks for the moment) and that it “does not spare Hollande.”

AFP Photo/Jewel Samad

Interested in world news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

When COVID-19 was overwhelming New York City hospitals during the 2020 spring, a silly talking point in right-wing media was that residents of red states didn't need to worry about the pandemic because it only posed a threat to Democratic areas. But COVID-19, just as health experts predicted, found its way to red states in a brutal way. And the current COVID-19 surge is especially severe in red states that have lower vaccination rates. Journalist David Leonhardt, in an article published by the New York Times this week, examines a disturbing pattern: red states where residents are more likely to be anti-vaxxers and more likely to be infected with COVID-19 and die from it.

Keep reading... Show less

Gov. Doug Ducey with Senate President Karen Fann and former President Donald Trump

The Republican-led Arizona election audit found that President Joe Biden actually won by a slightly wider margin than initially reported, but Trump supporters are still demanding that the election results be overturned.

In fact, according to Tucson.com, the demands have increased since the audit results were made public. Arizona's Republican Gov. Doug Ducey reportedly received approximately 300 emails a day on Saturday and Sunday demanding that he decertify the state's results for the 2020 presidential election.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}