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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Washington (AFP) – The U.S. Senate will hold a public hearing on civil and human rights after a grand jury’s decision to not indict a policeman who killed an unarmed black youth triggered violent protests.

The case of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was shot during an altercation with a Ferguson, Missouri police officer, sparked a national debate about race, police-community relations and civil rights in America.

When it was announced Monday that a group of jurors opted against filing charges against the white officer, furious protestors set buildings ablaze and clashed with police in the St. Louis suburb.

The Senate Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on the constitution and civil rights will hold its hearing December 9. While witnesses were yet to be announced, the panel will use the Brown case as a basis for discussion of racial disparities in the criminal justice system.

“This year’s events in Ferguson, Missouri have highlighted the continued need to reevaluate and reform police practices, including the militarization of state and local law enforcement,” the office of Senator Dick Durbin, who chairs the subcommittee, said Tuesday in a statement.

AFP Photo/Florissant Avenue

 

 

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Dr. Anthony Fauci

Photo by The White House

A Maryland anti-vaxxer is facing charges for threatening National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Anthony Fauci over email-- going as far as to warn the face of America's COVID-19 response that he would be "hunted, captured, tortured and killed," among other things-- according to court documents that were unsealed on Tuesday.

According to the affidavit filed in support of a criminal complaint, Thomas Patrick Connally, Jr. committed two violations-- threatening a federal official and sending interstate communication containing a threat to harm, both of which are felonies.

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