The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

What do Occupy Wall Street protesters have in common with NBA players who are on strike? At first glance, not much. Few basketball stars are worried about avoiding foreclosure, and the people camped out in Zuccotti Park aren’t signing multimillion-dollar endorsement deals with Nike. But as Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren tells CNN’s American Morning, they’re all being exploited by the richest of the 1 percent.

Dorian explains that the driving force behind the NBA strike is that team owners are raking in bigger profits than ever while claiming there’s not enough to go around when it comes time to compensate the players who are doing the actual work. Sound familiar? The difference between basketball players and most American workers is that the athletes still have a strong union that’s ready and willing to fight for their interests.

To read more about the strike and why it represents an opportunity for solidarity rather than resentment, check out Dorian’s recent Washington Post op-ed, co-written by Princeton’s Paul Frymer.

Cross-Posted From The Roosevelt Institute’s New Deal 2.0 Blog

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}