By Jim Hightower

The Airline Industry’s Fee-For-All

December 5, 2012 12:13 pm Category: Memo Pad 11 Comments A+ / A-
The Airline Industry’s Fee-For-All

Big news, holiday travelers! American Airlines has a new family deal for you. If you and the kids are headed off to grandma’s house, Disney World or wherever, American will make an effort to seat you next to each other.

Well, that’s not exactly new or special, since most airlines have long done this. But here’s the “new” part in American’s family seating deal: You pay a fee for it. Being seated together is no longer a gracious service, but a calculated nickel-and-dime opportunity for the corporation to squeeze more out of you. And, actually, it’s quite a bit more than a nickel or a dime — to get “family seat reservations,” American hits you up for $25, each way.

Of course, paying this corporate tax doesn’t guarantee that your seats will actually stay attached to the plane. American, you might recall, had a rash of flights grounded in October due to the rather startling in-flight experience of passenger seats suddenly coming loose. At the time, the airline’s executives rushed to suggest that disgruntled members of the Transportation Workers Union were behind this odd malfunction.

Well, no. Internal documents have now revealed that the sabotage came right out of the executive suite. In order to charge additional fees to customers wanting a bit of extra legroom, the geniuses at the top ordered that the seating plan on American’s 757′s be reconfigured.

Fine … except they then tried to get the re-installations done on the cheap. Rather than having their own highly skilled and experienced mechanics do the work, they outsourced it to low-wage, non-union contractors. The contractors, in turn, “misinterpreted” American’s maintenance manual, did “incorrect installations” of seats and even had students doing some of the installations.

Finally admitting to this shoddy management, American’s hierarchy resorted to cold corporatethink to rationalize it: “Our competitors (do maintenance) where it is most cost-effective,” they explained. “We must similarly adapt.”

Cost-effective? Fee-fie-foe-fum, I smell another fee coming on. “You want safety? Hey, we’ve got a fee for that.”

Those who say we should run government like a business must not be frequent flyers.

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The Airline Industry’s Fee-For-All Reviewed by on . Big news, holiday travelers! American Airlines has a new family deal for you. If you and the kids are headed off to grandma's house, Disney World or wherever, A Big news, holiday travelers! American Airlines has a new family deal for you. If you and the kids are headed off to grandma's house, Disney World or wherever, A Rating:

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Comments

  • nobsartist

    Now that WE have paid for new airports as part of the millionaires welfare plan, perhaps it is time to regulate the airlines again.

  • kfreed

    Passenger strike. Enough people boycott at the same time in an organized effort or continue taking it up the rear. Those are your choices.

    • http://twitter.com/LostAnarchist S-3

      This. People from America need to be able to escape the violent revolt and anarchy that I know is coming because of BS fascism against trusting customers like these.

    • tobyspeeks

      It’ll happen. The airlines are like republicans. They keep doing the same thing over and over and it always ends in failure. The funny thing is they’ll never figure out why.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jim-Myers/100001512942781 Jim Myers

    If the fee for using the toilet is high enough, I can see the day when mom and dad tell junior to just pee on the floor.

    Thant’s not illegal, is it?

  • CPANewYork

    Screw American Airlines.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/RFEPMKNCBVGJYV2X7LBNDGRUEY William

      Don’t forget Delta.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ADQLAQT527QDIMBMHSHTQEZQDE Jeremy WilliamM

    I flew — or tried to fly — American exactly once, about 6 years ago. The experience was so bad I vowed never to use that airline again.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/RFEPMKNCBVGJYV2X7LBNDGRUEY William

    With $36Billion in no cost to them fees and they are still in trouble all the time. Does that tell you anything about the Management.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Daniel-Jones/827014412 Daniel Jones

    N4ext up: The Airline Industry Lobby, and how they prioritize NOT improving ground transport infrastructure!

  • gherrick

    I was pleased that I lost the opportunity to pay to rent a parachute, were we herded out the exit door as our Ryan Air flight plunged earthward; it didn’t, and I did. I wouldn’t have had to pay the toilet tax, because I could never have reached it, given I was wedged into a window seat, two away from the narrow aisle, with two hulking bodies blocking my way. Suit up with a catheter next time…

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