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President Donald Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen shared information about ‘possible irregularities’ in his former boss’s family business with federal prosecutors last month, according to a new report in the New York Times.

The report is not specific about what they discussed, and it is not clear what exactly the information may be used for. It also noted that Cohen discussed a donor to Trump’s inaugural committee, Imaad Zuberi, who was previously named in a subpoena for the committee’s records. Previous reports have suggested investigators are interested in the committee for potential crimes regarding the donation of foreign money or influence peddling.

The report also noted:

[The] meeting suggests that they are interested in broader aspects of the Trump Organization, beyond their investigation into the company’s role in the hush money payments made before the 2016 election to women claiming to have had affairs with Mr. Trump. Mr. Cohen pleaded guilty last summer to arranging those payments.

Cohen pleaded guilty to campaign finance violations related to the hush money payments as well as tax and bank fraud crimes. Separately, Cohen pleaded guilty to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s charge that he lied to Congress about negotiating a deal for a Trump Tower Moscow during the 2016 election. He has been sentenced to three years in prison for those crimes. While he was initially scheduled to go to prison at the beginning of March, a judge agreed this week to delay that date by two months while Cohen continues to arrange plans to testify before Congress.

The John Hossack House

The John Hossack House

When we think about the history of slavery in the United States we often think of the Underground Railroad and attempts made by Abolitionists and others to help slaves escape from the South to the free states of the North and Canada. What we don’t realize is that despite the near mythic role popular history has ascribed to it, the Underground Railroad was in its heyday (1850-1860) the route to freedom for fewer than 30,000 slaves by most estimates – out of a slave population of 4.5 million.

There are many places throughout the Northeast and parts of the Midwest where the Underground Railroad’s stations and safe houses can still be seen.

The Bialystoker Synagogue

The Bialystoker Synagogue on New York's Lower East Side

The Bialystoker Synagogue on New York’s Lower East Side

The Bialystoker Synagogue located in New York City, it was built as the Willett Street Methodist Episcopal Church in 1826. The building contains one of the railroad’s rest stops in a small attic above its balcony.

The Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House

The Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House

The Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House

The Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House, Odessa, DE: It is said that Harriet Tubman once hid in this still-functioning meeting house built in 1785.

The Erastus Farnham House

The Erastus Farnham House

The Erastus Farnham House

The Erastus Farnham House, Fremont, IN: Located just south of Indiana’s border with Michigan, this was an Underground Railroad stop. Indiana was a slave state, but Michigan was not.

The Octagon House

The Octagon House in Fond-du-Lac, WI

The Octagon House in Fond-du-Lac, WI

The Octagon House, Fond-du-Lac, WI: One of the many hidden passages in this 1856 house was used to shelter slaves heading to freedom.

Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge

Painting of runaway slaves who lived in the Great Dismal Swamp

Painting of runaway slaves who lived in the Great Dismal Swamp

Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, VA and NC: Runaway slaves did not only find refuge in brick and mortar safe houses, many hid in the swamp to escape detection until they could safely make their way to freedom. One of Harriet Tubman’s novels, Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp, is about the Maroon’s who lived here.

John Hossack House

The John Hossack House

The John Hossack House

John Hossack House, Ottawa, IL:  Abolitionist John Hossack sheltered fugitive slaves in this house. In 1860 he was convicted in Federal Court of violating the Fugitive Slave Law.

Reverend George B. Hitchcock House

Hitchcock House

Hitchcock House

Reverend George B. Hitchcock House, Lewis, IA: Hitchcock was an Abolitionist who hid slaves here in the 1850s.

Mount Zion A.M.E. Church

Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church

Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church

Mount Zion A.M.E. Church, Woolwich Township, NJ: This historic 1799 church was an important stop on the Underground Railroad.