By @LOLGOP

5 Worst Moments Of Ted Cruz’s Fake Filbuster

September 25, 2013 1:01 pm Category: Memo Pad, Politics 155 Comments A+ / A-

Ted Cruz Screenshot Fake Filibuster

Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) promised the Republican Party a fight — and he gave them a show.

Cruz  thrilled the Republican base with some absurd Nazi references and by humbly comparing his effort with the Bataan Death March – while enraging the Republican Party’s donor class.

Observers are debating whether the junior senator technically engaged in a filibuster of the bill he encouraged House Republicans to pass after it was stripped of the language that would defund Obamacare.

It’s worth pointing out that Cruz didn’t actually filibuster, because that would have required him to have the support at least 41 senators from his own party. He doesn’t. What he had was a negotiated window of time (that he gave up an hour of so he could go on the Rush Limbaugh Show) in which he was able to make a spectacle and thus not get the blame when his plot to stop Obamacare fails. Or, if he’s successful, he’ll have intimidated House Republicans into rejecting their altered bill and actually shutting down the government.

Here are five of the most comical moments from Ted Cruz’s “filibuster” that should go down — way, way down — in history.

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5 Worst Moments Of Ted Cruz’s Fake Filbuster Reviewed by on . Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) promised the Republican Party a fight -- and he gave them a show. Cruz  thrilled the Republican base with some absurd Nazi references an Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) promised the Republican Party a fight -- and he gave them a show. Cruz  thrilled the Republican base with some absurd Nazi references an Rating:

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  • Mortalc01l

    That spectacle has to be the saddest, most embarrassing thing that ANY politician in my lifetime has engaged in; calling it Quixotic would be giving him FAR too much credit…

    What it was, was a thinly disguised and pathetic BEGGING session. He was begging the Tea Party and other assorted right-wing loons to not primary him and not blame him for the passage of Heritage care/Romneycare/Obamacare.

    Pandering to your base has been elevated to an art form with this slimy snake.

    • montanabill

      He was telling you the truth about Obamacare and you are too bull headed and partisan to listen. Unless you are one of the people who is getting a handout via Obamacare, you will find your costs going up, your choices going down and ultimately, some all-wise bureaucrat deciding what and how much care you are to receive.

      • Mortalc01l

        Hey Bill. I voted for Reagan, way back when Republicans were educated, smart and knew that the USA was more important than the party.

        What we have now, is a party full of dunces who couldn’t find Sweden or Russia or Kenya on a map of the World and whose math skills are significantly lesser than my cat’s.

        I own 3 businesses, one of which provides software to the US military; I also served my country and fought for it. I should be a Republican wet dream, but today’s bunch of semi-literate, science denying, bible-thumpers are anathema to the REAL Republican party.

        People like you are the reason my old party has become such a huge failure; you are blindly and foolishly wedded to the party to the point that you don’t CARE whether the Republican party brings the country to it’s knees, in fact you would WELCOME it, like the other dolts and assorted loons who can’t wait to shut the Government down.

        When you place “winning” on behalf of your political party above the needs of God and Country, you have become the enemy Bill.

        Talking of handouts; why is it that the “red” states are the real takers Bill? Why are 9 of the top 10 welfare states all Republican? Why are ALL of the top 10 producers of wealth and income all Democratic states Bill?

        What about the welfare given to Big Agra and Big Oil?? They get ten times the handouts of any other program, why don;t you do something useful with that mediocre brain of yours and start picketing Exxon, or Eli-Lilly, or Monsanto and ask them to stop suckling off the Government teat … That way YOU and I could stop sending our tax dollars to multi-billion dollar Corporations.

        And as for truth Bill, you and the truth have LONG been strangers.

        • montanabill

          You were doing good until you spouted off that liberal nonsense about “red” states. It shows you have no idea on what or how the money is spent in any state. You are and always have been a liberal without any idea of how this country was founded, how capitalism works, it’s true history or why your ideas, if followed, would take this entire country to the same place Detroit finds itself.

          • Sand_Cat

            You’re at your clueless best, Bill. Congratulations.

          • nirodha

            Bill, you are absolute living proof of the failure of the far right to use any brainpower whatsoever. I admired Bill Buckley for his intelligence and wit even though I disagreed with him ideologically. I would venture to say that if you even knew who Buckley was, you and your kind would label him as too liberal.

          • jointerjohn

            Pretty convenient how you can determine who and what Mortalc is and has always been. Do you have any idea how that reveals your arrogance? That’s not even to mention the rudeness of calling him/her a liar without proof. Mort is exactly right about red states being the takers and blue states being the makers. Saying it isn’t so can’t change that reality. Is that how you cope with every fact you don’t like? That’s what preschoolers do, but most outgrow it. I too, like Mort, am a successful businessperson, we know how capitalism works and don’t need any lessons from you. It works best when regulated. Detroit by the way is a casualty of unrestricted international corporate greed. The jobs that made that city great are now in Mexico and China.

          • montanabill

            What Mortalc and you did was to take a statement, that on its face is true, but totally glosses over the reasons as to what makes the statement true. It is a perfect example of false logic. Example: Idaho is a red state. But over 50% of Idaho is owned and managed by the Federal government, so a huge chunk of the money flowing to Idaho is actually flowing to government. There are also Indian reservations throughout Idaho that are government assistance zones and a large migrant population. How about Mississippi? Nearly 50% of that state’s population is black and latino, groups that have a notoriously high percentage on government assistance.

            The Detroit statement is another example of the same logic. The jobs are now no longer in Detroit, but you conveniently put the blame of some nebulous international greed instead of where it clearly lies with union over-reach.
            This stuff isn’t too hard to research, so I don’t normally feel the need to provide basic education.
            If you feel your business need regulation, it is probably true. And some regulation serves a useful purpose, but when the number of regulations, actually law created by unelected bureaucrats, increases to current levels, it stifles business, innovation and is extremely costly to manage.

          • Dominick Vila

            Bill, do you honestly believe the outsourcing of manufacturing jobs to China and other countries is the result of union over-reach? What exactly do you mean by that? Are you suggesting we should not expect full time jobs? Livable wages? A 40-hour week? Overtime pay?
            You are absolutely right, if we were to accept Third World living standards, working conditions, and an environment similar to what prevails in places like Bangladesh, there is a good chance our jobs would not be outsourced. Is that what the GOP is proposing? If not, where is the beef?

          • montanabill

            Let me ask you a question. Are the employees working for Toyota plants in Indiana, Kentucky and Mississippi paid a liveable wage? Do they work 40 hour weeks? Do they get paid overtime if they are requested to work more than 40 hours per week? How does their wage/benefit package compare to UAW packages in Detroit? Should we force the automakers to go to Michigan, pay those UAW wage/benefits and build inferior quality cars just so union feelings won’t be hurt?
            Outsourcing seems to be a gigantic issue for the left. Do you know what percentage of the jobs that is? Clue: Less than 2%
            The GOP is proposing ideas that will allow U.S. companies to compete equally with the world, in terms of taxes and a reasonable level of regulations. They are not calling for child labor, less than subsistence wages, or any other demonic demands on workers. Since what we are doing certainly isn’t working, maybe it is time to give their ideas a try.

          • nirodha

            “Union over-reach”? Unions helped to build this country into the greatest power in the history of the world. Look at the heroic role played by unions in manufacturing the material that helped us win WW2. Unions rescued millions from low-pay sweatshops by insisting on living wages. Unions helped get children out of the workplace where greedy company owners exploited them, and into decent schools where they belonged. The union label meant quality workmanship once upon a time. It’s no wonder that the 1%ers are bent on destroying the unions; there will be no one to stand up for the working folks. Now try to find a product that is not made in China. Yeah, I am a card-carrying union member, Bill, and proud of it! Unions, the people who brought you the weekend!

          • montanabill

            Yes they did. But that was then and this is now. The world has changed, believe it or not.

          • nirodha

            Yeah, it sure has, ever since Ronnie Raygun busted the federal air traffic controllers union, because they refused to cave and let him have his own way. He, who was formerly a union man himself (onetime head of SAG, the Screen Actors Guild) while he was starring in movies with monkeys, playing second banana (sorry, couldn’t resist). There’s no lower form of scab than one who turns on his union sisters and brothers!

          • montanabill

            Really! My impression is that the unions, as currently constructed, are all about the leadership, not the rank and file.

          • nirodha

            Well, your impression is incorrect. Where did you get that impression?

          • montanabill

            Oh, I don’t know. It just came to me out of the blue.

          • Yvette White

            you are like so many conservatives in this country its your Hate that drives you, and its what will kill you, And in your case I hope its very soon, not just you all like you, you are a cancer in this country and its a dame shame, and if you no your bible like so many of you clime to, then you should know that all who do evil let them continue to do Evil and we will look around one day and you all will be gone, so keep up the good work

          • montanabill

            Sorry Yvette, you are barking up the wrong tree. I’m a fiscal conservative, not a social conservative. BTW, try spell check.

          • Mortalc01l

            So you have no facts, no clue and no hope Bill.. You haven’t refuted a SINGLE fact I posted.

            My facts are correct; look at any source you wish to.. the red states TAKE more than they pay, that’s a fact, look it up on the GAO website; also, the blue states pay the most in taxes, another fact that you cannot refute.

            I know more about capitalism than you could EVER hope to know. I was in banking before I started my businesses. I have owned businesses for over 25 years and know EXACTLY how capitalism works, since I have been successful.

            I suspect the only thing you know about business has been spoon-fed to you by Limbaugh and Beck.

            I am a TRUE conservative Bill, not a treasonous traitor like you and the TEA Party who LOST the last two elections, yet are determined that a small minority are going to try to blackmail the rest of us by threatening to DEFAULT on bills that REPUBLICANS also agreed to pay when they voted to spend the money.

            When the Republican party gets rid of the Tea Party loons, the religious nuts and the racists; when they get back to being educated and supporting science and find a sound fiscal policy, rather than the completely debunked “trickle down” theory that has been an abject failure, THEN I might vote Republican again like I once did.

            Until then, the Republican party is a farce of epic proportions; a bunch of know-nothing people who spout sheer nonsense and refuse to educate themselves on any fact… You guys spout insanity.. things like “Keep your filthy Government hands off my Medicare”.. do you know how blindingly stupid a person has to be, to write and think something like that Bill?

          • montanabill

            I have refuted that red-blue state junk before. It is simply a true statement built without consideration of the underlying reasons. Very much like saying Dhaka is larger than New York, therefore, it must be a greater city. I don’t have to look up anything to know that a state like New Jersey pays more in taxes than a state with 1/8 the population like Montana. On the other hand, the U.S. government doesn’t own half of New Jersey as it does Montana. Nor does New Jersey have the same number of miles of U.S. highway that Montana does, or the same number of Indian reservations.

            If you were ever a capitalist, you wouldn’t claim that ‘trickle down’ is an abject failure. Money doesn’t trickle up any more than water does. People aren’t employed by poor people. It is investors, people with money, that build the factories and businesses that hire people. That is the start of the cycle which then provides more people with money to use to buy goods and services.

            If you were paying the least bit of attention to what the Tea Party is really seeking, instead of what liberal yellow journalism has painted, you would know that they are simply not, never have been, racists. In fact, had you ever been to a Tea Party rally, you might have been shocked to see Americans of all colors speaking and attending. I’ve never seen sign like your silly ‘Keep your filthy…” claim. Their goal is simple. They want the U.S. to return to the principles of the Constitution, to the kind of country of self-reliance and freedoms our founders had hoped they had created.

            So you can keep spouting your claims about being a capitalist or former Republican. If they are true, you weren’t then and you aren’t now.

          • Mortalc01l

            So, as I stated you have zero facts to back your spurious and incorrect claims; just personal opinion.

            As an owner of three businesses, my bona fides on being a capitalist are plain to see.. Do YOU own any businesses Bill? I employ 49 people, one of my companies supplies security software to the military; another of my companies supplies secure wireless to large skyscraper type buildings.

            I HAVE been to Tea Party rallies Bill; that’s where I got my loathing for the Tea Party… Remember the “keep your filthy Government hands off my Medicare” Bill? THAT’S the level of sheer stupidity that exists only within the Tea Party.

            One of my friends became a member of the Tea Party and we had many discussions on why he did it. He did it for reasons I could understand, but after about three years, he left the Tea Party, because he couldn’t stomach the racism he was hearing when TP members talked about Obama being a monkey, the N word and worse.

            There is NO denying the TP’s racism, it’s a thread that runs through every narrative they spin and I have heard it IN PERSON from numerous people attending the rally I was at.

            For all your voluminous posting Boll. you NEVER refute the arguments that are made by using facts and data from reliable sources. Your reply above mine consists purely of personal opinion, speculation and sheer fantasy that only exists in your head.

            The PER CAPITA “take” is higher in Red states than Blue, FACT. Here’s a quote from Business Insider (a massively right wing biased journal).

            Rich states like New Jersey, New York, and California (which frequently get blasted by conservatives for having high taxes and big government) pay a lot more in federal taxes than they get back from the federal government. While Republican states, with their low taxes and small governments, get more back than they pay in.

            This map demonstrates that phenomenon. The ones shaded blue pay in more than they get back. Texas is the only “blue” state here that doesn’t vote Democratic.

            Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-is-now-experiencing-its-own-bizarro-world-version-of-the-euro-crisis-2013-1#ixzz2gUPnbotC.

            So as usual, I prove you know nothing and are just a rabid attack Dog. Frothing at the mouth, absent thought or intelligence, seemingly overwhelmed with rage and hopelessness in the face of a World that you do not understand and that is passing by people like you with a limited intelligence and a limited capacity for logic, reason or comprehension.

            My work is done here Bill. Continue to enjoy the rest of your life with Obamacare as law.

          • montanabill

            Yes, I built and own four and one is much larger than yours. If you actually attended a tea party rally and heard that kind of talk, you have a right to be offended. I have attended a number in different parts of the country. I saw and heard offensive behavior only from leftist radicals who crashed the gathering to see if they could start trouble. At every rally, the response was the same. These people were ignored and eventually ushered away by security people. At every rally, people of color, black, and latino, were speakers and audience members. I did notice very few orientals.

            I hadn’t read business insider before. If Mr. Weiselthal is typical of its contributors, it is hardly a ‘massively right wing’ or even slightly right wing journal. Clue: no, even slightly right wing writer, would ever mention Paul Krugman, except to point out where he is constantly wrong. The article was a typical leftist piece, high on leftist points, woefully short on real data and background. In short, a hack piece.

      • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG

        He was not telling the truth about the Affordable Health Care Act, he was telling the Obama haters what they want to hear, so he could raise money and advance his own political career. If you put a moustache on him he could be the Villain in the Dudley Do Right cartoon.

        • montanabill

          The stuff he is saying is pretty easy to verify. If you don’t do it, it is because you don’t want to do it.

          • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG

            The problem is if you listen to Faux News, Drudge Report, Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck and other conservative print media you can get the verification you want, but that doesn’t make it fact. You claim it is easy to verify – give the links.

            I would like someone to direct me to the page or pages in the law that references “Death Panels”. Republicans
            have made the overblown claim that the law is a job-killer, but experts predict a small impact on mainly low-wage jobs. The Republican National Committee says 8.2 million part-timers can’t find full-time work “partly” due to the law. That’s the total number of part-time workers who want full-time jobs, and there’s no evidence from official jobs figures that the law has had an impact.

            Proponents
            say premiums will go down, while opponents say they’ll go up. In general,
            employer plans won’t be affected much, and a price change for individuals
            seeking their own insurance will vary from person to person. Obama claimed
            that all of the uninsured would see lower premiums than what they could
            get now (before accounting for federal subsidies), but that’s not the
            case.

            Critics
            continue to make scary claims about the government coming between you and
            your doctor, but the law doesn’t set up a government-run system. If
            anything, the law comes between you and your insurance company, forbidding
            them from capping your coverage or charging you more based on health
            status. Meanwhile, Obama can’t promise you can keep your plan. Employers
            are free to switch coverage, just as they were before.

          • montanabill

            As someone who works in the health care industry and has employees in many states, I can tell you the costs for their coverage has been rising sharply as the direct result of the imminent activation of Obamacare. I don’t need to read about it in the WSJ or the NYTimes (where it has appeared). I pay the bills for it.

            FYI: The ‘Death Panels’ are a euphemism for government bureaucrats deciding what care you will be covered for and how long. I sincerely hope you never have a loved one who suffers that. It can happen now with insurance, HMO’s, etc., but you still have recourse. When the government is decider, you will have no recourse.

          • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG

            There is no lifetime cap under the new law. If your healthcare costs are rising because of the imminent activation of the Affordable Care Act, than perhaps you should start shopping around. Government will not be deciding what care you will be covered for and for how long – give me the page number (2024pgs I believe) of the law where it states that.

            Lost my job because I had the audacity to get sick and even though I went to work everyday while getting treatment, I still was terminated – at will state – no reason required. Eight months before my Cobra ran out I started contacting insurance companies, most would not return my calls finally three months before it ended I went to the company who provided my coverage while I was employed. They said yes at a rate of $1,208/month which the same coverage while I was under my employers plan was $400. No choice had to take.

            In 2009 my doctor wanted me to have a procedure that they believed was in my best interest. The insurance company gave authorization and I had the procedure done Oct. 2009. The insurance company pays the hospital the 80% I pay the 20% and we move forward. May 2010 I receive a letter from my insurance provider informing me they have withdrawn their approval of the Oct 2009 procedure and have withdrawn their payment to the hospital. We confirmed this with the hospital who provided us with the original approval, their payment and their withdrawal. They were sending me a bill for the 80,000. I could not believe this was allowed appealed and lost. So we were forced to hire an attorney. Still not resolved, that heavens for attorneys who take cases on contingency. So please don’t talk to me about for government bureaucrats deciding what care you will be covered for and how long it is the insurance companies.
            By the way last year my insurance company discontinued the plan I was on and I had to seek other coverage, and am now on Medicare.

          • latebloomingrandma

            How do like being on Medicare?

          • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG

            This is my first year and so far – no problems. I see all the same doctors that I had when I was covered by private insurance.

          • ococoob

            As of today, Medicare and Medicaid are the BEST coverages anyone can get!

          • nirodha

            So sorry to hear of your travails. Without knowing the details, it’s hard to believe that an insurance company can withdraw your coverage, post-op and retroactively. The hospital should be sued for agreeing to refund the 80% coinsurance so long after the fact. I hope you have a cutthroat litigator who will make your former company, the insurance company and the hospital bleed for all the pain and suffering and mental anguish to which they have subjected you. If you had been a union member you would not have lost your job for becoming sick. Best wishes to you!

          • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG

            Thank you, just hoping it gets resolved in my favor. You are so right about the Union.

          • latebloomingrandma

            Not exactly true. An independent advisory board of 15 members, made up of medical, insurance, financial people, will be looking at ways to bend the cost curve, and reduce fraud and abuse. They are prohibited from proposals that would ration care to Medicare patients. A big part of this will be research into comparative effectiveness. You would think this concept would be important. Who wants to pay for procedures or treatments that have been shown to be ineffective? Private business often searches for the best practices, why not the health care field?

          • montanabill

            I don’t care if it is a board entirely of brain surgeons or real estate agents. It is a board that can take away a choice I might want to make.

          • ococoob

            You says that? Where’s the proof ?

          • montanabill

            Medicare and the VA.

          • ococoob

            Hogwash!

          • nirodha

            Individual insurance companies have always had that power, and with far less scrutiny and transparency.

          • montanabill

            True. But you can challenge their decisions through the legal process. Not easy and not inexpensive, but insurance companies will settle if the expected legal battle reaches a cost threshold. The government has no such barriers.

          • nirodha

            But there are appeal procedures built into the ACA to address such inequities. Also, granted that it’s difficult, but one can sue the feds.

          • montanabill

            Yes, they can. But do the Feds take into account any costs of defending themselves when we are paying for it?

          • ococoob

            Obamacare HASN’T even started yet!! How can you claim, today, at this moment, your employee high costs was a direct result of Obamacare??????!!!! Blaming the current healthcare costs due to Obamacare is BUNK!

          • montanabill

            Clueless. Come back when you have been responsible for paying for employee healthcare.

          • ococoob

            I pay my own, jerk! And for employees, as of now, most employer/employee share payment for the premium and yet, the employer gets the tax write-off, not the employee.

          • latebloomingrandma

            Death panels came from the mind of Sarah Palin.

          • Ford Truck

            The should be “Death panels came from the [SMALL] mind of Sarah Palin.

          • nirodha

            Mind? What mind?

      • Bill Boltz

        Your head is up your ass again, montanabill. Have you heard or seen the early results of how this law will effect the public? Cost in most cases are lower than expected. Have you read the law? Most people haven’t; it’s around 1000 pages long. So tell us more, oh wise one.

        • ceverettham

          It is over 2500 pages long Oh wise one.

          • Bill Boltz

            Really? Thank you correcting me. Leave it to the media to misinform…again! So….have you read it? I don’t know anyone who has.

          • ceverettham

            I haven’t read it. I rely on the alphbet news networks for my information.

          • Bill Boltz

            Me too…..I heard the 1000 page statement on wbbm radio this morning on the way to work.

          • ceverettham

            I guess that I don’t know who to believe anymore. I will listen to wbbm radio and check it out.

          • Bill Boltz

            Don’t bother…I just went to HHS.gov. The full text of the Affordable Health Care Act is there plus related texts, but you are right enough….the text is 2409pp.

          • ceverettham

            Thanks. Sounds like a lot of dry/boring reading.

          • Bill Boltz

            Oh yeah……if you’re sufferring from insomnia, this is the cure.

          • Bill Boltz

            I think the wbbm radio guy was referring to the Supreme Court ruling text that I believe was around 970 some odd pp.

          • Dominick Vila

            …and most of those pages were written to address the GOP’s concerns about Obamacare paying for abortions, or medical services being extended to illegal immigrants.

          • Bill Boltz

            Yes sir….They have there agenda and make no secret about it.

        • montanabill

          I guess it is possible that some people will find a lower rate, but by simply looking at the new rules on who, what and how on the insurance companies can operate, it is clear that they will need someone with the ability to feed the multitudes with few fish to be able to lower costs to the majority.

          I refer you to the WSJ article: “Young Buyers Face Sticker Shock on New Insurance Exchanges”

          • Bill Boltz

            I looked at that and then took one of the worst cases; Arkansas – $31 to $190. I went then to arktimes.com
            “Obamacare rates lower than expected in Arkansas
            Some will see rate hikes but situations vary.”
            You’ll notice that the rates posted in the WSJ article are “sticker prices”. Most people anf families will qualify for subsidies which will lower those rates significantly. Thank you for your article, montanabill. At least you’re presenting verifiable sources.

          • nirodha

            Sorry, Bill, the WSJ is a stooge mouthpiece for the 1%ers, not a reliable, nonpartisan source.

          • montanabill

            Then try the NY Times.

          • nirodha

            Fine, but what does the NYT have to say about costs for the ACA? The Boston Globe (owned by the NYT) points out that in general, rates after qualifying subsidies are considerably lower than had been previously reported. See a trend here?

          • montanabill

            Not exactly ‘as reported’, the White House comment was, ‘expected’. And while ‘lower than expected’ , they are still higher than current rates. Since the White House was expecting even higher rates which that would have made them much higher than today’s rates, the White House lied to you when they said you could expect lower costs than today’s rates. Do you see a pattern?

          • nirodha

            Now that you mention it, I do see a pattern. That pattern is your constant obfuscation of all matters pertaining to the current administration. Face it, Bill, Obama is going to be the president through 2016, no matter how much that grates on you. I do have some empathy, however. I felt much as you do now for every day that Georgie Boy “Mission Accomplished” Bush was our president. Maybe Obama is some kind of karmic payback to the conservative right for electing Bush. Who knows?

          • montanabill

            Obfuscation or cutting through the crap? I fully understand that Obama will be President until 2016. I also understand that Bush is no longer President and hasn’t been for 5 years. I also understand that beginning with his campaign for the Presidency, Obama has had no problem lying, being a hypocrite or continuing his posture of just ‘being there’. The left accepts it because they bought into ‘Hope and Change’ and is loath to admit ‘the One’ might not be all he was hoped to be.

          • nirodha

            See? The pattern repeats itself!

          • ococoob

            Also, owned by Rupert Murdoch, the yellow trash titan!

  • latebloomingrandma

    Lord help us all. After surviving the scare of having a possible VP Palin, then watching the spectacle of the the Republican candidates clown show, i didn’t think it could any worse. Then along comes this shameless yokel. Surely psychiatry has some diagnosis for him.

    • Chuck McCoy

      For starters, Narcissistic Personality Disorder …

      • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG

        He could benefit from the Affordable Health Care Act and finally get help for his Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

        • nirodha

          Even though it’s a pre-existing condition!

  • docb

    Not difficult to please low information idiots..joe macarthy cruz was in it for himself and self aggrandizing. Made a laughing stock of himself!

    • montanabill

      The low information idiots are ones who support Obamacare.

      • docb

        You are sorely mistaken and blinded by the right wing bobble heads!

        Just returned from Whitefish. At least your state has some redeeming people and qualities, you aside, mbill!

      • Sand_Cat

        OK, Bill. Give some “information” about why this is bad. Not Fox talking points, not your vague and self-serving drivel about “takers,” etc., but real information. What SPECIFICALLY about the law is bad, and WHY? Why is it different from Romneycare, which -in a rare case of good coming at least partially from Romney – seems to be working out in Massachusetts, why that state isn’t bankrupt and its people reduced to penury and destitution by this horrible, socialist, Republican plan conceived by the Heritage Foundation and supported by the GOP until it was adopted by the guy with the wrong skin color?

        • Bill Boltz

          I guess he’ll have to wait for the next Rush Limbaugh episode.

        • montanabill

          I don’t care about Romneycare. It was another ill advised intrusion by government.
          1. Your insurance will cost less. See WSJ ‘Young Buyers Face Sticker Shock’
          2. Check the statistics on the number of doctors electing not to participate and are moving to cash only practices.
          3. Check the limitations that are being placed on which medical facilities you can use for treatment.
          4. Check the number of people who are losing work hours and being reduced to under 30 hours because of the requirements on companies by ACA.
          Actually, the list can get pretty long. But since you are computer savvy, a quick Google will get you everything you don’t want to know.

          • Bill Boltz

            BIll….what companies are cutting back employees work hours to escape the law besides the greedy fucks who’ve been doing it all along ie: Walmart? I’d really like to know.

          • montanabill

            Virtually every restaurant that can. Along with most in the hospitality industry and huge numbers of small businesses. If you really have to ask that question, you simply haven’t been paying attention.

          • Bill Boltz

            I’ll tell you who’s NOT paying attention…..YOU!! The fucking restaurants!! The fucking restaurants!!! You moron!! The restaurant industry is notorious for part-time workers. Their type of employment practice has been in place since I was 15 years old (1967). You are a moron, Bill. Get a fucking life!!

          • montanabill

            Is that code for, “I’m too lazy to research and think, so I’ll just swear at the guy to prove my point.”?

          • Bill Boltz

            No, Bill. I have a lifetime of experience with those facts since I have as a child and some of my family members work or have worked in the field of restuarant/hospitality. I called you a moron because you have no idea what your saying on anything so far except what the WSJ or Fox News or Bill O’Reilly or Rush Limbaugh have to say. If I don’t know something about a subject I will ask someone who does or I will research it, but this subject is not hard to know. I hate to swear at people, Bill, but I have high blood pressure issues and the only way I can release the pressure when I’m dealing with someone like you is to swear at you….it’s not called for or fair…I’m sorry. But please, Bill. Pick the fight you can win. You’re out of your depth here. Have a great day.

          • montanabill

            As the owner of a company with branch offices in some of the biggest tourist areas of the world, and also where I have friends who operate chains of restaurants, both fast food and general dining, I will not change my original comment. I notice, that while you continued to insult, you didn’t really dispute what I said, you simply said I didn’t know anything about it. Guess again.

          • Bill Boltz

            Bill…Bill…Bill….you claim I didn’t dispute your comment? Did you not read my message? Apparently not. Read it once again, you may have missed something. Since you say you’re the “owner of a company with branch offices in some of the biggest tourist areas of the world”…etc.. etc…do you offer health insurance to your employees? You’re starting to resemble a character we all have read here (medfordresident anyone????).

          • montanabill

            I pay very high wages, pay full family medical and dental, have a 401K plan that has never contributed less than 15% of salary. If you had seen previous posts, you would have known. I hire the very best people I can find because their desire to succeed means that the companies will have the very best chance to grow and prosper, which they do. We have grown and added people, even during the worst of the recession. I will tell you that the increased costs imposed by this administration’s new regulations and Obamacare have slowed that down considerably. My managers are instructed to not hesitate to get rid of slackers, negative attitudes or troublemakers. Such a person is given one change to change (which is almost never) then they can work for some other company.

          • Bill Boltz

            I haven’t seen previous posts by you, so you’ll have to forgive me for that, but I must say I commend you on your care and concern for the quality of life bestowed on your employees. Tell me, Bill, in what type of business are you? I’m getting the impression….travel…vacation….?? Considering that “Obamacare” doesn’t start for another few days yet, how does the costs affect you? Can you give us specifics?

          • montanabill

            I have several business in unrelated fields. One primary business is in the health care automation market. It is not insurance. That is as specific as I’ll get.

          • Bill Boltz

            Health care automation? What is that? One of my daughters is a dental technician and the oldest is a surgical prep nurse at a level 3 hospital. I’ve yet to hear those three words “health care automation. Don’t tell me the name of the business but please explain the basics of health care automation. You wouldn’t believe what images are going thru my mind on that subject.
            I understand your need to be vague. You wouldn’t want people to associate your beliefs to your businesses.

          • montanabill

            It involves computers.

          • Bill Boltz

            I Googled “Healthcare Automation” to get my answer. You’re either an end-user supplier for the IT products/services or a consultant. I’m sure you do very well in that industry. There’s a great deal of revenue to be had there….govt contracts….private owned nursing care….etc…etc…almost limitless. I don’t understand your reluctance to the ACA. I would think it would enhance your bottomline…..is it just me or does anyone else see the hypocracy?

          • montanabill

            No government contracts. We do not pursue government business and if an entity of government wishes to buy our product, which has happened from time to time, they pay the same products and services as any non-government entity. We do not give them preferential pricing.

            You are right about the ACA creating more business for us. It has happened every single time the government has decided to muck about ‘helping’. However, our business would do just fine, even if government stopped ‘helping’. If not for our products, government ‘help’ would have buried and eliminated many health care providers all ready.

          • Bill Boltz

            I agree with you about our govt. help not always stellar, but if this type of thing (ACA…RomneyCare) is working in some areas (Pennsylvania, California) why not try it everywhere and tweak it where needed. I can’t help thinking that if Romney would have won (God Help Us) and put forth this law it would have passed with less obstruction. The Dems in the senate would fight for changes but not like we’re seeing in the house today. now the govt going to shut-down over a 3 year-old law. This is ridiculous and it’s going to cost all of us far more than it’s worth. And you have to admit Ted Cruz is off the range. Nevertheless…good luck to you and your family and let’s get through this mess in one piece.

          • montanabill

            While I think there are a few admirable pieces to ACA, the majority is simply bad, costly legislation. The bill does virtually nothing it was sold to do except cover pre-existing conditions and make insurance, maybe, affordable to a few of the supposed 5-32 million (choose your number) who couldn’t afford insurance but wanted it. (We will never know the truth to that situation.) That so-called affordability is coming at a substantially greater cost to the other 330 million people than if we were simply taxed a few dollars more. It was, on purpose, designed to grow the scope and size of government.

            Had the law been crafted with Republican participation, it might have been a law that people could accept and might have actually provided some reforms. Without the bribes, arm-twisting, threats to hold-out Democrats and the questionable method of passage, ACA would not be law. The Democrats now saying, “It is the law of the land.” are precisely like the Democrats of the 1860′s on legal slavery.

            You are wrong about us accepting a similar proposal by Romney. From your tone, it is obvious that you were taken in by the all vicious demagoguery heaped on Romney. He was not my first choice, but in the end, the only choice if we had wanted our economy to recover.
            If you had actually listened to Ted Cruz and checked his facts, you might admit that he was tilting at windmills, but that his statements and goals were correct.

          • Bill Boltz

            The Christian Science Monitor ran an article called: Romneycare vs. Obamacare: Lessons for today’s shutdown bebacle. “You won’t hear many Republicans say it, but Mitt Romney’s health care insurance program in Massachusetts seen as a model for the Affordable Care Act has been largelt successful and popular.” I don’t the time to go into it…I’m at work and on break. I guess a lot of thinking people in this country have been “taken in” as you put it by “vicious demogoguery” heped on Romney. And here I am trying to find a positive spin on the man and find one. Ted Cruz, I’m afraid has few if any redeeming qualities in my view. He was grandstanding, pure and simple, for the elevation of his name and he won. I think you and I are going to have to agree to disagree on him for sure. I don’t like all I see in this ACA either and it seems like it went in to law the same way many bills get passed in Washington. I’m not naive, sir. That part of it certainly stinks.

          • montanabill

            You do understand that there is a substantial difference between the politics of Massachusetts and the most of the rest of the country. Romney might have been able to sell that plan to states like MA, NY, CA and other bastions of the welfare state, but he would not have been able to sell it to most of America, and he knows it. However, like ACA, it had a few good points and with Republican help along with Democrats, they could have crafted a plan that incorporated those good points along with the good points that were specifically denied Republicans during the Obamacare process. A bill such as that would not be under majority disapproval today.

            Almost unanimously from the readers of National Memo, they were convinced that Romney was a predatory capitalistic and that getting rich by funding companies was a bad thing. The lies and misrepresentations were outrageous. Never mind that Kerry, Gore, or Pelosi are far richer. Romney was portrayed as a man who couldn’t understand ordinary people, even though he had been strictly middle class in his younger years.

            Frankly, I can’t understand why you cannot tolerate grandstanding from Ted Cruz but appear to have no problem with it from Barack Obama.

          • Bill Boltz

            Bill….you were doing so well until the end there. Grandstanding by Obama? Really? When did you ever here President Obama recite Dr. Seuss on the taxpayers dime. Or anything remotely close to what that weirdo Cruz did for 20 odd hours? The Cruz display was an excersize in futility. You seem like an very intelligent person and then go off the beam for this idiot. You’re an enigma….

          • montanabill

            If you haven’t recognized grandstanding by Barack Obama for 7 or 8 years, I’m afraid you don’t recognize grandstanding when you see it. Is Dr. Seuss the only thing you heard from Sen. Cruz’s talk? If so, it is a apparent you were only looking for fault and not listening.

          • Bill Boltz

            So, speeches made by an incumbant president is considered “grandstanding” in your mind. Well…if that helps you sleep at night, Bill great. I thought you were smart…I guess I was wrong. You’re just another narrow minded teabagger. Maybe you and Cruz can cuddle-up next to a fire and discuss such important matters as slavery and how unfair life has been for you guys. Awww…how cute…….sickenning!

          • montanabill

            Meaningless, contradictory, full of hyperbole, speeches made by Barack Obama. The most recent was his on camera statement about how the shutdown might affect some poor soldier with PTSD, when he knows full well the VA is fully funded and is not affected by the shutdown. But I’m sure I’m just being narrow minded by pointing this out.

          • Bill Boltz

            Of course you are. I’m glad you noticed. Saves me the trouble. And George Bush would never stoop to that would he? How about WMD’s in Iraq? I suppose you just forgot about that. Oh there I go being narrow minded too.

          • montanabill

            Previously Saddam had used chemical weapons. He lead everyone to believe he had nuclear weapons or was working on them. No, we didn’t find them, but I challenge you to prove that Bush did not know we wouldn’t find them and was, therefore, lying.

          • Bill Boltz

            Yeah, right…..as if I had the resources or the time to prove that to you or anybody for that matter. No…I’ll trust my gut on that one if you don’t mind. Considering Dick Cheney had much to gain by invading Iraq and was in all practicality President….It’s a pretty safe bet he knew what was going there. Oh wait!!!! What am I thinking???? Only Obama lies….right??? They all lie, Bill. You’re naive if you don’t believe that. Of course you will argue Obama’s lies are greater still. Whatever helps you sleep at night. At least you have a warm bed. Many don’t..Count your blessings.

          • Bill Boltz

            I do understand politacal geography, of course. Something popular in one region will not neccessarily go over well in another. I don’t care how much money someone makes…the more the better. We are stuck with this thing for now and the whole argument about it is going to shut-down the govt. I hope it doesn’t last too long or there will be more problems than this ACA law could ever have generated on its own. Whether you like it or not it is law now. You need get one of your guys in the White House to change it. It doesn’t look too promising for your side right now. Most people are gonna blame Boehner and the Tea Party for this crap. You don’t agree with me I know, but the shit is going to hit fan either way.

          • montanabill

            Regretfully, the ‘its the law’ argument was the same when used by Democrats in the 1860′s to support slavery.

          • Bill Boltz

            That’s hardly relevant, Bill. Can’t you come up with an example a bit more current. Comparing slavery with the ACA??? I’m sure our African-American citizens are cheering you right now.

          • montanabill

            I really hadn’t thought of comparing ACA with slavery, but now that you mention it, there is a lot of similarity. The Master is telling us what to do or get punished. Anyway, don’t play dumb, you know the comparison is the silly, ‘Its the law’ claim.

          • Bill Boltz

            You’re the one who tied the slavery comparison to ACA…not me; I just elaborated. 8) What??? no good??

          • ococoob

            Look who’s calling the kettle black here. Where’s your research and sources, jerk?

          • montanabill

            You have access to a browser and you ask that question? Really?

          • ococoob

            Don’t engage in a debate unless you want to persuade your audience to see your point with FACTS and SOURCES. If you don’t have these, your audience goes zzzzzzzz and your credibility is zilch!

          • montanabill

            It also doesn’t pay to engage in a debate where people won’t look up their own information, including from sites with whom they don’t philosophically agree. It doesn’t pay to engage in a debate with name callers, because they have already proven they can’t think. Have a good day.

          • ococoob

            List your facts or sources. If not, SHUT THE HELL UP and quit stinkin’ up space here!!!

          • nirodha

            I live in Massachusetts and Romneycare has been working just fine, thank you, for the past 4 years. No one has been bankrupted, lots of folks who previously had no health insurance are now covered, costs have been reduced, and the only downside is that it is not a single-payer plan. But we’ll work on that, Bill, and then our insurance coverage will resemble that of the rest of the developed world, where socialized medicine is the norm, and people are healthier and live longer.

          • montanabill

            Interesting! People are paying for other people’s insurance. All levels of risk are covered, regardless of the cost to the insurance companies, and costs have been reduced. Like to see the math on that.

          • latebloomingrandma

            Isn’t that the concept of insurance? I continue to buy homeowner’s insurance every year, but never had a fire. I’m sure I paid for someone else’s fire damage,though.

          • montanabill

            You also have the choice to either buy the insurance or not. If you could easily afford to take care of any damage from a fire on your own, given the odds, you might elect to not buy insurance. ACA is a far different animal that, in all respects, is a major intrusion on everyone’s freedom of choice. And that is one of the big objections.

          • nirodha

            First of all, I don’t know how you can state that “ACA…is a major intrusion on EVERYONE’S (caps for emphasis) freedom of choice”. I doubt that you speak for everyone; you certainly do not speak for me, and I do not find that the ACA is an intrusion at all. If I did, I would exercise my freedom to choose no insurance by opting out and paying a tax of $90. So, what’s the big deal? No harm, no foul!

          • montanabill

            A $90 tax is ‘no harm’. Good for you. Oh, by the way, how did you arrive at the $90 number?

          • nirodha

            Take your own advice, Bill. “You have access to a browser and you ask that question?” Really?

          • montanabill

            So I repeat, $90 is ‘no harm’?

          • LotusJoan

            How about car insurance? It is, in most states mandated. I have had coverage for years without a claim, it is called pooled risk and it is how insurance works. I look forward to 10/01 when I can finally pool my health risk with others in my state.

          • montanabill

            However, if you don’t own a car, you don’t have to buy insurance nor do you have to pay a fine for not having it. You should also realize that a substantial number of drivers (a large percentage of illegal immigrants, for example) don’t have required insurance, but drive anyway.
            So far, in most, if not all, states where the exchanges are operating, insurance costs more than it did prior to the exchanges. Add to those increased costs, all of the new taxes imposed by Obamacare and ‘affordable’ health care becomes a laugh.

          • nirodha

            Look at statistics presented recently by the World Health Organization. The US of A is generally in the middle of the pack worldwide when it comes to infant mortality, medical outcomes following major surgery, and general longevity. Those nations with socialized medicine (Sweden, Finland, Canada, Denmark, Italy, France, etc.) have better results. Also, many of those countries have no insurance companies to extract additional costs from consumers.

          • montanabill

            Ahhh! Now that you have quoted an urban myth, your job is to google ‘infant mortality in countries with socialized medicine’ and learn something.

          • nirodha

            Also, there are generally no insurance companies, per se, in many of the countries with socialized medicine.

          • Sand_Cat

            If you think the National Memo and MSNBC are partisan, they can’t even begin to match the Wall Street Journal, even before Murdoch bought it.
            And who compiled and cited these statistics?
            The trend of employers’ reducing their employees to penury by declaring them “independent contractors” or some other BS has been going on practically since before Obama was born.
            Most reasonable people accept (or used to accept) that a few restrictions to prevent thousands or millions of people from DYING for lack of medical care is a reasonable thing. The problem is that there are virtually no reasonable people left in the GOP or especially at the WSJ. One of the revealing moments in the GOP debates was the whoops of sheer joy and enthusiastic affirmation at the question “would you just let [the person who could afford insurance but had none] die?” No doubt, if you were watching, you felt the same, based on your posts here.
            No one suggests that the problem was a simple one, or likes someone who could otherwise take care of himself that comes to the public trough instead, but the kind of demonic glee shown by the audience at this and other equally evil or dishonest statements is more than enough to convince me I’m on the right side of this debate. It appears to me is that you show the same excitement at the suffering of others, and rationalize this by determinedly maintaining the delusion that no one in this country could possibly be poor or unable to work except by conscious personal choice. I suppose it’s an improvement on those who are singing about Jesus while they grind the poor underfoot, but not much of one. You seem like a rational, intelligent, and – other than in this area of willful blindness – rather admirable person. Sorry to see things go this way.
            Finally, a better plan – perhaps one less objectionable to even you – might well have resulted from good-faith participation by the opposition in crafting it, but they were too busy assuring Obama’s re-election (for which I am grateful to them, though I wish they’d done it some other way) by chucking the good of the nation and everything else in favor of making him a “one-term president.”

          • montanabill

            I didn’t bother to read your whole rant because you start with a disbelief of the WSJ. Then how about checking that bastion of super conservatism, the NY Times. BTW, I’m a fiscal conservative, not a social conservative. Time to wise up.

          • Sand_Cat

            Then don’t read it. Frankly, I don’t know why I wasted the time, anyway; clearly you are smarter and more worthy than I, at least in your own mind.

          • ococoob

            As usual, your credibility is lost and why should anyone have to listen to your drivel when you can’t back up your assertions with facts and sources. Take a pill, go lay down, and shut the hell up.

  • silence dogood

    What’s the problem ? Poll after poll shows most people agree with him. Congress doesn’t even want to be covered by it.

    • awakenaustin

      Congress has a better plan which you and I mostly pay for. I would like their plan too. So would you. (It is the same one available to all federal government employees.) 72-75% of the cost is paid by the government. The program allows them to pick among a large number of private insurers, move their plan yearly, no exclusions for preexisting conditions, immediate coverage, all the plans cover everything and have catastrophic coverage which covers very large medical expenses. (Ins companies love it too. They get top premiums from a generally more healthy than average work force.)

      Re: the polls. I would refer you to Jonathan Alter’s article Sept. 24. Maybe you should consider how deep and how wide the objection to the ACA is. Do a little research on your own, and do not just review the headlines from various news outlets.

      Health care provisions for all of us is a work in progress. I myself do not like the ACA because it isn’t a universal coverage-single payer program. The ACA is not perfect, maybe even far from it. How could it be perfect? It is after all, essentially a Republican/conservative idea/plan which they were for, before they were against it.

      When all the froo-froo is stripped away, Republican opposition to the ACA seems to be no more and no less than, it isn’t a good thing because this liberal-ish Democratic Party President with mocha colored skin tones advocated it.

      Be my guest, tie your wagon to that horse’s ass Senator Cruz. I look forward to what will be the equivalent of a train wreck.

      • Bill Boltz

        Yes…here’s how it reads:
        Members of Congress have good health insurance by any standard, but it’s not free and not reserved only for them – and it’s not government insurance. House and Senate members are allowed to purchase private health insurance offered through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, which covers more than 8 million other federal employees, retirees and their families.
        It’s not a “single-payer” system where the government acts as the one and only health insurance company. As President Bush’s chief of personnel Kay Coles James said in 2003, while lecturing at the conservative Heritage Foundation, “the FEHB program is not centralized, government-run health care.” It has drawn praise both from conservatives and liberals, including President Obama, who held it up as a model for his own health care proposals.
        According to the Congressional Research Service, the FEHBP offers about 300 different private health care plans, including five government-wide, fee-for-service plans and many regional health maintenance organization (HMO) plans, plus high-deductible, tax-advantaged plans. All plans cover hospital, surgical and physician services, and mental health services, prescription drugs and “catastrophic” coverage against very large medical expenses. There are no waiting periods for coverage when new employees are hired, and there are no exclusions for preexisting conditions. The FEHBP negotiates contracts annually with all insurance companies who wish to participate. There is plenty of competition for the business; FEHBP is the largest employer-sponsored health plan in the U.S.
        Those who don’t like their coverage may switch to another plan during a yearly “open season” period. To help with the choices, FEHBP conducts an annual “satisfaction survey” of each plan with more than 500 members and publishes the results.
        Like other large employers, the government pays a large share of the cost of coverage. On average, the government pays 72 percent of the premiums for its workers, up to a maximum of 75 percent depending on the policy chosen. For example, the popular Blue Cross and Blue Shield standard fee-for-service family plan carries a total premium of $1,327.80 per month, of which the beneficiary pays $430.04. Washington, D.C.-based employees who prefer an HMO option might choose the Kaiser standard family plan. It carries a total premium of $825.15 per month, of which the employee pays only $206.29.
        In addition, members of Congress also qualify for some medical benefits that ordinary federal workers do not. They (but not their families) are eligible to receive limited medical services from the Office of the Attending Physician of the U.S. Capitol, after payment of an annual fee ($491 in 2007). But services don’t include surgery, dental care or eyeglasses, and any prescriptions must be filled at the member’s expense.
        House and Senate members (but not their families) also are eligible to receive care at military hospitals. For outpatient care, there is no charge at the Washington, D.C., area hospitals (Walter Reed Army Medical Center and National Naval Medical Center). Inpatient care is billed at rates set by the Department of Defense.

        Update, Aug. 6, 2012: This item was updated to reflect the employee share of the monthly insurance premiums for 2012.

        • awakenaustin

          I think you and I read the same article or consulted the same source.

          • Bill Boltz

            LOL…I noticed that too as I sent it. Oh well…at least we’re investigating this stuff and not just spouting shit.

    • Bill Boltz

      Congress doesn’t need to be covered by it you idiot!!! Their health care is covered by our taxes. I’d wouldn’t mind theirs one bit.

      • silence dogood

        “idiot”?

        • Bill Boltz

          Sorry…..I get frustrated sometimes, silence dogood.

        • nirodha

          If the foo shits, wear it!

          • silence dogood

            Gee — You must be very clever.

  • JD Mulvey

    Cruz is so principled that he vows to hold the floor as long as it takes to kill healthcare reform –or until he gets a chance to be on Rush Limbaugh’s show.

    • johninPCFL

      And then of course whn his jibber-jabbering was over he voted to consider the bill that he just wasted 21 hours delaying.

      • jointerjohn

        That’s because his geek-show never was about the ACA, it was about getting himself two days dominance of the news cycle. He’s a narcissist, a self-promoting charlatan. He is ripping the Republican Party to shreds just in time for the midterm primary season. Thank you Senator Cruz for that fine public service.

        • Yvette White

          Don’t go blaming him for being the asshole that he is, but you conservatives have to take your blame for this man, you all made him, and now you mad cause the Devil want his just dew, this is what you get when you makes deals with the Devil, I don’t like Cruz nor do I agree with any thing he says or do, I am just say what is true and you all know it

  • jnsgraphic

    “Green Eggs and Ham” teaches “kids” not to make their mind up about something without trying it, and is a great metaphor for Obamacare… once people try it, they might actually like it! The #1 reason Republicans don’t like Obamacare is because they can’t stand anything the President proposes that may be a success and prove them wrong. If they thought it was going to fail they wouldn’t be trying so hard to stop it.

  • KarenJ

    Cruz thrilled the Republican base with some absurd Nazi references and by humbly comparing his effort with the Bataan Death March – while enraging the Republican Party’s donor class.

    This brings up a question, obviously. If Cruz is alienating the “Republican Party donor class”, does he expect his run for the 2016 Tea Party/Republican nomination for Prez to be financed by the “wacko birds”?

    In today’s political financial climate (thanks, Citizens United), it’s going to take a lot more than what the rednecks, libertarians, white supremacists, and nativists can scrape together out of their camo pockets and couch cushions.

    Maybe Cruz can sponsor ONE bill in the U.S. Senate before he starts campaigning for 2016: repealing Citizens United…so he benefits, of course (and if he wins the presidency, he’ll probably re-institute it by executive privilege).

  • koopa

    Wendy Davis is (D-Fort Worth) not (R-Fort Worth).

  • Landsende

    Even though Rafael Cruz knew there was no chance of stopping the vote and making a fool of himself he is probably very pleased with his performance as he was mentioned on all the news shows and in all the newspapers. He doesn’t seem to care that most republicans strongly dislike him and think he’s crazy. He is a megalomaniac with a messianic complex. Hopefully if he keeps up his antics even the tea party fanatics will realize what most republicans already know, that he has serious mental issues.

    • nirodha

      I don’t think that the really unhinged TPotty nutcases will think any ill of Rafael at all. He is their hero, and exhibits something that they value a great deal: willful ignorance as evidenced by a total disregard for facts. The TP base believes that if intelligence means being like Obama and the “libruls”, then they will be just the opposite and espouse stupidity. The far right wing has been that way for a long time, denigrating “them pointy-headed intellectuals”.

  • FT66

    I would love to see the poll taken of independents and some Dems whether they were swayed with Cruz’s move. I really doubt there is any. Igniting the base! that is nonsense as the base will always be there. Cruz will be remembered as the man who used 21 hours or so, trying to persuade others and his move failed completely to the ground level.

  • 1bythebrooks2

    When he looks in the mirror, it is the fool meeting the fool, NOT the fool meeting the thinker!

  • tax payer

    I would put everyone of my employees on part-time in my Company and avoid paying for their insurance ( if I had a Business ) since they would qualify for Medicaid with the minimum wages I would pay them. Isn’t Obamacare Great!

  • http://mohammeddressup.com/ I Zheet M’Drawz

    Fire him! Just whoever can fire him. Have the governor do it or if he won’t then fire the governor.
    These people are hired by US to work for & represent US, their constituency. This man represents special interests that contribute to his campaign. If he works for US but does their bidding then he needs to be fired immediately.
    We can no longer tolerate this insane behavior.

  • RobertCHastings

    He feels that he has made a great contribution to the issues he presents. However, were this “filibuster” attempted in the Texas state legislature, he would have broken the rules in the first five minutes and been told to shut up and sit down. Rules in our Senate are, apparently, (at least in regard to the conduct of a filibuster) NOT what they were when Mr. Smith went to Washington.

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