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Sunday, May 28, 2017
ProPublica
Mar-a-Lago

Any Half-Decent Hacker Could Break Into Mar-A-Lago

We have also visited two of President Donald Trump’s other family-run retreats, the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., and a golf club in Sterling, Virginia. Our inspections found weak and open Wi-Fi networks, wireless printers without passwords, servers with outdated and vulnerable software, and unencrypted login pages to back-end databases containing sensitive information.

May 18, 2017
Trump Inauguration

Trump’s New Bank Regulator: Lawyer Who Helped Banks Charge More Fees

Keith Noreika helped big banks avoid state laws protecting consumers. As head of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, he now has the power to override those state laws.

May 16, 2017
maternal-mortality-lead-1200-800-1ad608

The Last Person You’d Expect To Die In Childbirth

The U.S. has the worst rate of maternal deaths in the developed world, and 60 percent are preventable. The death of Lauren Bloomstein, a neonatal nurse, in the hospital where she worked illustrates a profound disparity: The health care system focuses on babies but often ignores their mothers.

May 12, 2017
A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser in a photo illustration in Paris April 15, 2014. REUTERS/Mal Langsdon

Internet Company That Does Business With Hate Sites Alters Complaint Policies

Cloudflare, a major content delivery network that has a variety of white supremacist websites as clients, has said it will change its policies to allow people to more safely lodge complaints about the material on the hate sites.

May 11, 2017

Comey’s Testimony On Huma Abedin Forwarding Emails Was Inaccurate

FBI director James Comey generated national headlines last week with his dramatic testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, explaining his “incredibly painful” decision to go public about the Hillary Clinton emails found on Anthony Weiner’s laptop.

May 9, 2017
Sean Spicer, White House, Lies

You Helped Us Find Hires The White House Never Announced, Including A Koch Brothers Alum

Mike Roman, a longtime Republican opposition researcher who worked for billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch before joining the Trump campaign, is now the White House’s director of special projects and research. He is one of a half-dozen unannounced hires the White House has made since President Trump took office.

May 4, 2017

How One Major Internet Company Helps Serve Up Hate On The Web

Since its launch in 2013, the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer has quickly become the go-to spot for racists on the internet. Women are whores, blacks are inferior and a shadowy Jewish cabal is organizing a genocide against white people. The site can count among its readers Dylann Roof, the white teenager who slaughtered nine African Americans in Charleston in 2015, and James Jackson, who fatally stabbed an elderly black man with a sword in the streets of New York earlier this year.

May 4, 2017

America’s Other Drug Problem

Every week in Des Moines, Iowa, the employees of a small nonprofit collect bins of unexpired prescription drugs tossed out by nursing homes after residents died, moved out or no longer needed them. The drugs are given to patients who couldn’t otherwise afford them. But travel 1,000 miles east to Long Island, New York, and you’ll find nursing homes flushing similar leftover drugs down the toilet, alarming state environmental regulators worried they’ll further contaminate the water supply.

April 29, 2017
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Trump gives a thumbs up as his supporters rip apart a sign being held up in front of the candidate by protestors at a rally in Portland

We’re Investigating Hate Across The U.S. There’s No Shortage Of Work.

Earlier this year, ProPublica and a coalition of newsrooms set out to chronicle and report on hate crimes in the United States. The project, “Documenting Hate,” was meant to provide some reliable information about an issue that has caused considerable alarm but been plagued by a lack of comprehensive data and sustained reporting.

April 25, 2017

Hate Crime Law Results In Few Convictions And Lots Of Disappointment

From 2010 through 2015, there were 981 cases reported to police in Texas as potential hate crimes. ProPublica examined the records kept by the Texas Judicial Branch and confirmed just five hate crime convictions. In the course of reviewing dozens of other individual case files for potential convictions, we found another three.

April 11, 2017
ProPublica

ProPublica, New York Daily News Win Pulitzer Gold Medal

ProPublica provided three researchers who helped perform the time-consuming work of going through every nuisance abatement case filed in the previous year and a half — 1,162 in total — tracking every major step of the process, cross-referencing hundreds of cases with parallel proceedings in criminal court and the State Liquor Authority, and entering the details into spreadsheets.

April 11, 2017
Drugs

Why A Staggering Number Of White Working-Class Americans Are Succumbing To ‘Deaths of Despair’

In 2015, Princeton economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton released a bombshell study that revealed a dramatic rise in mortality among non-Hispanic, middle-aged white people in the United States. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, their paper found that the increase in deaths among middle-aged white Americans between 1999 and 2013 is “comparable to lives lost in the U.S. AIDS epidemic through mid-2015.”

March 26, 2017

A 2-for-1 For Racists: Post Hateful Fliers, And Revel In The News Coverage

They’ve left their propaganda at campuses ranging from Clemson University in South Carolina to the University of Minnesota to the University of California in Los Angeles. In response, they’ve gotten coverage from local newspapers as well national outlets like CNN and the Washington Post. Universities have felt compelled to respond as well, like the University of Michigan, which unveiled an $85 million diversity and inclusion program just days after racist fliers were found on its Ann Arbor campus.

March 24, 2017
Preet Bharara

Is Preet Bharara Trying to Tell Us Something?

With his cryptic tweeted reference to a corruption-fighting commission in New York, did the fired U.S. Attorney send a message that Trump had tried to cut off a threatening federal investigation?

March 14, 2017
Classroom, Students

These For-Profit Schools Are ‘Like A Prison’

Camelot Education takes the students that public schools have given up on. But some current and former students say its discipline goes too far.

March 9, 2017
Habitat for Humanity

How A Tip About Habitat For Humanity Became A Whole Different Story

How a story about money laundering turned into a story about an ambitious housing initiative that led to the displacement of low-income families in Brooklyn.

October 30, 2016
Voting provisional ballot

Stand Up and Be Counted — Maybe

Under federal law, people are allowed to vote provisionally when there are questions about their eligibility, though some of these ballots are eventually discarded.

October 15, 2016
seditious libel, Trump, Media

Donald Trump And The Return Of Seditious Libel

This year, for the first time since at least Richard Nixon, the leader of one of our major political parties has pledged to limit press freedom by restricting criticism of his prospective rule.

September 27, 2016
Ohio voters cast their votes at the polls for early voting in the 2012 U.S. presidential election in Medina, Ohio, October 26, 2012. REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk

Which Voters Show Up When States Allow Early Voting?

Supporters of voting rights say partisan politics drives objections to early voting — which can particularly boost voting among minorities, a constituency that tends to vote Democratic.

September 23, 2016
Demonstrators hold placards during a protest against the visit of Donald Trump, at the Angel of Independence monument in Mexico City. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo

How Washington Blew Its Best Chance To Fix Immigration

Just four years ago, Republican leaders, coming off a presidential election in which their candidate received barely a quarter of the Hispanic vote, made a concerted push to reach a compromise on immigration reform. President Obama, too, elevated it as one of the top issues of his second term.

September 19, 2016
Republican presidential candidate Trump speaks at Dayton International Airport in Dayton, Ohio

The Great Republican Crack-Up

The Great Republican Crack-up Dayton was once a bastion of the GOP establishment. The story of how the city changed helps explain the rise of Donald Trump.

July 15, 2016
stacks of paper

Foiled By FOIL: How One City Agency Has Dragged Out A Request For Public Records For Nearly A Year

This is a story of one news organization’s attempts to get records to understand a problem.

April 22, 2016
U.S. President Barack Obama attends a roundtable meeting at Rutgers University Law & Justice Center in Newark, New Jersey, November 2, 2015. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Federal Government Finally Forgives Billions In Debt Of Students Who’ve Become Disabled

Starting April 18, loan forgiveness letters will go out to approximately 387,000 borrowers who have been identified as totally and permanently disabled.

April 15, 2016
NYPD barrier

NYPD Sued After Kicking Wrong Family Out of Home

Austria Bueno returned home after picking up her sons from school to find a stack of legal papers and two neon-colored stickers taped to her door.

April 13, 2016

Why Don’t We Know How Many People Are Shot Each Year in America?

By Lois Beckett, ProPublica. How many Americans have been shot over the past 10 years? No one really knows. We don’t even know if the number of people shot annually has gone up or down over that time. The government’s own numbers seem to conflict. One source of data on shooting victims suggests that gun-related violence […]

May 15, 2014