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Sunday, September 25, 2016

Prejudice Still Affects Our Polarized Politics

WASHINGTON — In August 2009, in an appearance on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” host Chris Matthews asked me about the angry, frequently irrational voters who were showing up at town-hall-style meetings around the country to denounce President Obama’s health care policy. Having watched TV news reports, I knew that many of those voters were older white Americans who benefited from Medicare. Why would they oppose a health care policy for others?

Matthews asked whether I thought that some of those voters opposed Obama’s Affordable Care Act because they were uncomfortable with having a black president. I responded that I did.

  • dpaano

    I think this is so true; however, not ALL people my age (65) feel the same way…I have NO problems with interracial dating or marriage (my best friend is married to someone of another race, and I’m married to a Pacific Islander myself). I, too, find it difficult to see how our older generation can vote for politicians who are out to gut our Social Security and Medicare benefits just because our current president is African American. It’s hard for me to understand how they cannot actually see what the GOP is doing to them as a whole. Voting for someone or not voting for someone because of his/her race is RIDICULOUS!!! Everyone needs to vote for the person that is going to do the most good for this country…unfortunately, that is not the GOP at this time. And, I’m not saying that because I’m a Democrat….I’ve voted Republican on some occasions. I’m saying that because I see the GOP Presidential candidates and what they stand for, and I don’t agree with it in the least!!

  • kidsarebabygoats

    When “the author” mentioned “older Americans between the ages of 65-83” who did you poll? It is my gut feeling that the African American or Black’s however you wish to refer, to as “the older Americans” if you polled them and you failed to mention any race or ethnic group, do not have a problem with a non-white president. au contrere.

    I may be contrite mentioning the following thought, but it seems that when a president has a wife and they are able to fulfill all of each others needs makes a well rounded atmosphere. Cast in fact, Harry Truman, Jimmy Carter, John Kennedy and Bill Clinton. Under these administrations “the American People” were considered versus the older presidents or the one that had a drinking problem where only the chosen few were considered. I guess this is a read between the lines comment. To make it clear, it seems “Sex” in the white house is good thing”. It smooths out rough edges making them smooth. The rich and the wannabees who feel they have a right to be rich because they have the right skin color vote republican.

    Racism and prejudice is alive and thriving. It never changed. It’s covert now.

    Run on sentences seems to be my forte that I must work on to correct.

  • rustacus21

    …to have this, the debate on race, in the 1950’s. We delayed, in spite of the upheavals of the 1960’s. It was put off again, in the 1970’s. The 1980’s was a time of (economic) crisis, so no time for it then, even though the warnings of the 1960’s (see the findings of an ignored report on race & poverty at: http://www.dol.gov/oasam/programs/history/webid-meynihan.htm) foretold & were realized, re: the hardships of a culture never fully equipped w/the necessary cultural, economic & literacy tools crucial to productive membership in this society. We tried to have the “discussion” during the 1990’s, but were shut down by neo-racist Republicans, angered by the diversity of a magnificently competent & extremely successful, I might add, Clinton administration. I don’t need to mention the implications of race, re: Afghanistan, Iraq, Katrina or the double whammy impact of tax cuts on African-Americans in particular, of the administration of 2001-2008. Some Americans tend to compartmentalize too many issues, leaving many panoramically blind, b/c of shutting out so many of the realities right before our eyes! As a consequence, African-American voters never feel enuff of a comfort level w/Conservatives to trust their tax-cut theory, vs. support of/for Liberal economic, educational & employment equality of opportunities, as “GUARANTEED” in the Constitution – & ALWAYS delivered, by Liberals. This “selective” opportunity Conservatives cling to is very definitely racially motivated. But we probably need to talk about it b4 the next election…

  • rustacus21

    …to have this, the debate on race, in the 1950’s. We delayed, in spite of the upheavals of the 1960’s. It was put off again, in the 1970’s. The 1980’s was a time of (economic) crisis, so no time for it then, even though the warnings of the 1960’s (see the findings of an ignored report on race & poverty at: http://www.dol.gov/oasam/programs/history/webid-meynihan.htm) foretold & were realized, re: the hardships of a culture never fully equipped w/the necessary cultural, economic & literacy tools crucial to productive membership in this society. We tried to have the “discussion” during the 1990’s, but were shut down by neo-racist Republicans, angered by the diversity of a magnificently competent & extremely successful, I might add, Clinton administration. I don’t need to mention the implications of race, re: Afghanistan, Iraq, Katrina or the double whammy impact of tax cuts on African-Americans in particular, of the administration of 2001-2008. Some Americans tend to compartmentalize too many issues, leaving many panoramically blind, b/c of shutting out so many of the realities right before our eyes! As a consequence, African-American voters never feel enuff of a comfort level w/Conservatives to trust their tax-cut theory, vs. support of/for Liberal economic, educational & employment equality of opportunities, as “GUARANTEED” in the Constitution – & ALWAYS delivered, by Liberals. This “selective” opportunity Conservatives cling to is very definitely racially motivated. But we probably need to talk about it b4 the next election…

  • Blue Indy

    I agree a hidden racism infects this country and probably does so more than most realize. But that brings up an interesting thought: If you have all this discomfort for some because we have a black President, what in the world would happen if Herman Cain and Obama were the two nominees?

    Who would the older Republicans vote for? -or would they just have a meltdown, and vote for neither?

    Jeez – almost makes me root for Cain…

  • robyndi17

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