The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By William Murphy, Newsday

NEW YORK — Firefighters were pouring water onto billowing smoke in East Harlem on Wednesday morning after a reported explosion and possible building collapse that injured about 15 people, officials said.

A Harlem Hospital spokesman said there was one patient so far in a “condition reported as serious trauma.”

“We are expecting more” patients, spokesman Lamarr Nelson said.

The incident in the area of 116th Street and Park Avenue was reported at 9:31 a.m. and the first firefighting units were on scene at 9:33 a.m., a Fire Department spokeswoman said. She said it was being handled as a fifth alarm by late morning, meaning there were about 44 units and about 198 firefighters on the scene.

The NYPD dispatched its bomb squad and Emergency Services Unit, and the federal Joint Terrorism Task Force was there as per usual protocol, officials said.

Jess Perez, 24, who lives just a few blocks away, said she felt her building shake badly, so her first thought was that something had happened to it.

“I came right out of my building,” Perez said. “I knew it was something big.”

Perez saw other people who also streamed onto the street, wondering what had happened.

“Suddenly I see people running,” she said. “I could see thick orange flames on top of the roof.”

A Con Edison spokesman said utility crews were out on the scene but they had no immediate word on what had happened.

Metro-North Railroad trains run on elevated track along Park Avenue at that point, and the MTA said service on the New Haven and Harlem lines into and out of Grand Central Terminal was temporarily delayed until further notice “due to police activity.”

AFP Photo/Andrew Burton

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}