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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Jim Hightower writes that the 2012 campaign is essentially a glorified auction between incredibly rich donors, in his column, “It’s Official: Money Now Governs America”

The rich are different from you and me, but the really, really, really rich are also different from the merely rich.

For example, the rich can buy caviar and Champagne, but the Triple-R Rich can buy entire presidential campaigns.

Take Sheldon Adelson, the moneybags who’s pumped $11 million so far into Newt Gingrich’s right-wing run. He has single-handedly kept Gingrich’s White House ambitions alive. Without this one guy’s money, The Newt would’ve been long gone. Thanks a lot, Sheldon.

But Adelson can easily afford to roll the dice on a far-out candidate. This global casino baron hauled in $3.3 million in pay last year. Not for a year — that’s what his hourly take was. In other words, his $11-million bet on Newt, which altered the Republican presidential race, was nothing — less than three-and-a-half hours of one of Sheldon’s workdays.

Even Rick Santorum, who’s so far to the right that his left brain has entirely atrophied from lack of use, is actually in the running for the GOP nomination. He insists that people are flocking to him because of the power of his ideas. Sure, Rick — and the power of Foster Friess’ money.

This little-known Wall Street multimillionaire has long been a partner in the Koch brothers’ plutocratic cabal and a steady funder of right-wing Christian politics. Friess modestly claims that God is “the chairman of my board.” I doubt that, but Friess definitely is Santorum’s guardian angel, having kept his campaign of wackiness afloat with untold infusions of cash. When Friess was told that Santorum’s recent caucus wins would prompt Mitt Romney’s Triple-R Richies to counterattack, he was thrilled. I think that “is so exciting,” he warbled.

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Ken Bennett

This article was produced by Voting Booth, a project of the Independent Media Institute.

Ken Bennett, the Arizona State Senate's liaison to its review of 2020's presidential election ballots, threatened to resign from that post live on conservative talk radio on Monday, saying that Cyber Ninjas, the Senate's pro-Trump contractors, have concealed their results from him for months and could even be manipulating audit data.

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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