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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

On Tuesday, former Florida governor Jeb Bush took his latest step toward a 2016 presidential run with the formation of a new leadership PAC, “Right to Rise.”

“We believe passionately that the Right to Rise — to move up the income ladder based on merit, hard work and earned success — is the central moral promise of American economic life,” the PAC states on its website.

Unfortunately for Bush, many observers seem to believe passionately that Right to Rise is a pretty dumb name.

Still, it could be worse. According to a list compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, more than 1,000 groups have organized as SuperPACs. Unlike Bush’s committee, a leadership PAC certain to be a cash cow, most of the SuperPACs have raised zero dollars. And many of them have names that make “Right to Rise” sound like poetry in comparison.

Here are 23 of the worst:

• Bringin’ Sexy Political Action Committee
• Raptors for Jesus
• Howard Stern Fans for a Baba Booey Tomorrow, Tmrw
• Minnesotans for Mitt’s Money
• Why Vote
• Hall & Oates Fans for America
• Zombies of Tomorrow
• Faux News Super PAC
• American Crosswords
• Patriotic Americans/More Patriotic & Am’cn America
• Super Ninja PAC
• PAC Your Bong
• A Cantor Out of Tune
• Americans for More Rhombus
• Fat Old Man PAC
• Have-nots Unite! Half-knots Untie!
• Hitch a Wang Bang Noodle 911 Night Long
• My Cat Xavier for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow
• No More Timeline Pages
• Slam Dunks, Fireworks & Eagles Super PAC
• Thank You Citizen’s United! Super PAC
• Just Drink the Koolaid
• Why Not ZoidPAC?

See the full list of SuperPACs here.

Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr

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