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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn, a cooperating witness in the ongoing Russia investigation, appears to have become a valuable source of information in special counsel Robert Mueller’s work, and according to a court filing Friday.

We know that because Mueller requested another two-month delay before Flynn’s sentencing. NBC reporter Ken Dilianian explained what that means on MSNBC’s “Deadline: White House” with Nicolle Wallace.

“We have to be careful about reading too much into this,” he said, “but the fact that they are continuing to delay Mike Flynn’s sentence, Mike Flynn’s cooperating with Robert Mueller’s investigation, suggests that he still has a lot more to give them.”

He continued: “And you can contrast that with George Papadopoulos, another Trump campaign aide, who pleaded guilty and was nominally cooperating, his sentencing has been scheduled for September. So they’re sort of done with him, it appears at this point. But Flynn may have a lot more to say.”

Watch the clip below:

Cody Fenwick is a reporter and editor. Follow him on Twitter @codytfenwick.

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

Photo by Master Sgt. William Buchanan / U.S. Air National Guard (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

On June 22, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed into law a Republican-sponsored bill that calls for standards of "intellectual diversity" to be enforced on college campuses in the Sunshine State. But the Miami Herald''s editorial board, in a scathing editorial published on June 24, emphasizes that the law isn't about promoting free thought at colleges and universities but rather, is an effort to bully and intimidate political viewpoints that DeSantis and his Republican allies in the Florida Legislature disagree with.

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