The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Washington (AFP) – U.S. Vice President Joe Biden will make a decision by the middle of next year on whether he will launch a 2016 White House bid, he said in an interview broadcast on Friday.

“There may be reasons I don’t run, but there’s no obvious reason for me why I think I should not run,” Biden told CNN.

He added that his decision would come “realistically, a year this summer.”

Biden said his decision would be driven by his assessment as to whether he is “the best qualified person,” to run the country.

“That doesn’t mean I’m the only guy that can do it,” he said.

“But if no one else, I think, can, and I think I can, then I’d run. If I don’t, I won’t.”

Biden, although fit and sprightly, would face questions over his age should he decide to run for president.

He would be 74 in January 2017 and would become the oldest president inaugurated for a first term.

Many analysts believe that the former long-term senator, who has unsuccessfully run for president twice before, would not get into the field if former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — already the prohibitive favorite to secure the Democratic nomination — enters the race.

Clinton has said she will make a decision this year on whether to take aim at the White House again, after her 2008 primary loss to President Barack Obama.

A Washington Post-ABC News poll last month of voter support for the nomination had the vice president a distant second to Clinton.

Biden garnered just 12 percent support to Clinton’s 73 percent.

AFP Photo/Mandel Ngan

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Lt. Gov. Janice McEachin

The Republican Party’s radical right flank is making inroads among voters and winning key primaries east of the Mississippi. But out West, among the five states that held their 2022 primary elections on May 17, a string of GOP candidates for office who deny the 2020’s presidential election results and have embraced various conspiracies were rejected by Republicans who voted for more mainstream conservatives.

In Pennsylvania, Douglas Mastriano, an election denier and white nationalist, won the GOP’s nomination for governor. He received 568,000 votes, which was 44.1 percent of the vote in a low turnout primary. One-quarter of Pennsylvania’s nine million registered voters cast ballots.

Keep reading... Show less

Rep. Ted Budd, left, and Cheri Beasley

On Tuesday, North Carolina Republicans selected Rep. Ted Budd (R-NC), a far-right extremist who has pushed false claims about the 2020 election, to be their Senate nominee. He will face Democratic nominee Cheri Beasley, a former chief justice of the state's Supreme Court.

As of Wednesday morning, Budd had received more than 58 percent of the GOP primary vote. Former Gov. Pat McCrory received just below 25 percent of the vote, while former Rep. Mark Walker received about nine percent of the vote.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}