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Washington (AFP) – U.S. Vice President Joe Biden will make a decision by the middle of next year on whether he will launch a 2016 White House bid, he said in an interview broadcast on Friday.

“There may be reasons I don’t run, but there’s no obvious reason for me why I think I should not run,” Biden told CNN.

He added that his decision would come “realistically, a year this summer.”

Biden said his decision would be driven by his assessment as to whether he is “the best qualified person,” to run the country.

“That doesn’t mean I’m the only guy that can do it,” he said.

“But if no one else, I think, can, and I think I can, then I’d run. If I don’t, I won’t.”

Biden, although fit and sprightly, would face questions over his age should he decide to run for president.

He would be 74 in January 2017 and would become the oldest president inaugurated for a first term.

Many analysts believe that the former long-term senator, who has unsuccessfully run for president twice before, would not get into the field if former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — already the prohibitive favorite to secure the Democratic nomination — enters the race.

Clinton has said she will make a decision this year on whether to take aim at the White House again, after her 2008 primary loss to President Barack Obama.

A Washington Post-ABC News poll last month of voter support for the nomination had the vice president a distant second to Clinton.

Biden garnered just 12 percent support to Clinton’s 73 percent.

AFP Photo/Mandel Ngan

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) / CC BY-SA 2.0

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For months, one postal worker had been doing all she could to protect herself from COVID-19. She wore a mask long before it was required at her plant in St. Paul, Minnesota. She avoided the lunch room, where she saw little social distancing, and ate in her car.

The stakes felt especially high. Her husband, a postal worker in the same facility, was at high risk because his immune system is compromised by a condition unrelated to the coronavirus. And the 20-year veteran of the U.S. Postal Service knew that her job, operating a machine that sorts mail by ZIP code, would be vital to processing the flood of mail-in ballots expected this fall.

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