The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times (TNS)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Amid concerns about sexual assaults on college campuses, California Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday signed a bill requiring high schools that mandate health courses to provide lessons aimed at preventing sexual violence.

One of 35 bills signed by the governor, the measure also requires lessons promoting affirmative consent by both parties before couples engage in sexual relations.

“I firmly believe that by instilling in young minds the importance of affirmative consent and relationships built on love and respect, that we can reduce the sexual violence inflicted on young women,” said Democratic state Sen. Kevin De Leon, who authored the bill with Democratic state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson.

The bill is the first of its kind in the nation, according to the lawmakers. It follows last year’s measure, signed into law, requiring college campuses to improve policies to prevent sexual assault and to require affirmative consent before couples engage in sex.

“Without taking action, more than 100,000 students will be sexually assaulted on college campuses nationwide,” said Sofie Karasek, co-founder of the group End Rape on Campus. “By passing this bill to educate high school students about consent, California is taking a critical step towards lowering that number.”

The governor also signed a related measure that requires instruction in sexual health education, expands lessons in HIV prevention and requires the teaching to be inclusive of different sexual orientations. Democratic Assemblywoman Shirley N. Weber authored that bill, AB 329.

Photo: The teal ribbon represents those who stand by those who have suffered from sexual assault. California teens will soon be schooled in the signs of sexual violence. Wikimedia

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Attorney General Merrick Garland

The coming weeks will be the most consequential of Merrick Garland's life — not just for the attorney general himself but for our country. Garland will have to decide, presumably with the support of President Joe Biden, how to address the looming authoritarian threat of former President Donald J. Trump and his insurrectionary gang. His first fateful choice will be how to deal with Stephen K. Bannon, the fascism-friendly, criminally pardoned former Trump senior adviser who has defied a subpoena from the House Select Committee investigating the events of Jan. 6.

That panel has issued a contempt citation of Bannon, which will reach the floor for approval by the full House early next week. When that resolution passes, as it assuredly will, Speaker Nancy Pelosi will ask the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia to open a prosecution of Bannon, which could ultimately cost him a year behind bars and a fine of $100,000. (Trump won't be able to deliver a pardon, as he did last January to save Bannon from prison for defrauding gullible Trumpists in a "build the wall" scheme.)

Keep reading... Show less

By Lisa Richwine and Bhargav Acharya

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A union that represents about 60,000 behind-the-scenes workers in film and television reached a tentative deal with producers on Saturday, averting a strike that threatened to cause widespread disruption in Hollywood, negotiators said.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}