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WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The U.S. Congress, ending weeks of infighting, gave final approval on Wednesday to a bill funding the government through Dec. 11 and averting agency shutdowns that would have otherwise begun on Thursday with the start of a new fiscal year.

By a vote of 277-151, the House approved the stopgap spending bill and will now send it to President Barack Obama for signing into law before a midnight deadline.

House Speaker John Boehner, who is resigning on Oct. 30, needed significant support from Democrats to pass the bill as a majority of his fellow Republicans voted against the measure.

(Reporting By Richard Cowan; Editing by Sandra Maler)

Photo: A lone worker passes by the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, October 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Roe V. Wade being overturned can impact midterm elections

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The fate of abortion rights is now in the hands of voters after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned decades of settled precedent in its ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is not a right under the U.S. Constitution.

Now that state legislatures are able to pass bills that restrict abortion, the outcome of elections for governors, attorneys general, and state lawmakers will determine whether abortion remains legal and how draconian bans will be.

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