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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Just before New Zealand voted to legalize same-sex marriage, conservative member of parliament, Maurice Williamson, made a speech that every opponent of marriage equality around the world needs to hear.

From TowleRoad’s transcript:

“I also had a Catholic priest tell me that I was supporting an unnatural act. I found that interesting coming from someone who has taken an oath of celibacy for his whole life.”

“I also had a leader tell me I would burn in the fires of hell for eternity and that was a bad mistake because I’ve got a degree in physics. I used the thermodynamic laws of physics. I put in my body weight and my humidity and so on. I assumed the furnace to be at 5,000 degrees and I will last for just on 2.1 seconds.”

“One of the messages I’d had was that this bill was the cause of our drought. This bill was the cause of our drought. Well if any of you follow my Twitter account, in the Pakuranga electorate this morning, it was pouring with rain, we had the most enormous big gay rainbow across my electorate. It has to be a sign.”

Williamson posted the picture of that rainbow on his Twitter account:

And if the rainbow wasn’t auspicious enough, after the bill passed, the entire parliament burst into singing the love song “Pokarekare Ana.” See if you can watch this without getting chills:

Screen Shot 2013-04-17 at 3.20.01 PM

Louisa Wall, the member who sponsored the bill.

 

 

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