The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau (MCT)

Arkansas Rep. Tom Cotton, a Tea Party freshman, dispatched Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor, according to Associated Press projections. The defeat of one of the rare Southern moderates remaining in the Senate underscored the sharply Republican turn the state has taken in recent years.

The heir to a political dynasty — his father is a popular former governor and senator — Pryor was elected to his second term six years ago unopposed, winning 80 percent of the vote. Since then Republicans have claimed the statehouse, the House delegation and the other Senate seat.

President Bill Clinton, an Arkansas native, was among the Democrats laboring for Pryor, who like other Democrats was pulled down by the unpopularity of President Barack Obama.

Cotton represents the southwestern corner of the state, including the small town of Hope, where Clinton was raised.

This breaking news story will be updated.

Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Anti-abortion demonstrators gather outside the US Supreme Court

Washington (AFP) - The US Supreme Court on Friday ended the right to abortion in a seismic ruling that shreds half a century of constitutional protections on one of the most divisive and bitterly fought issues in American political life.

The conservative-dominated court overturned the landmark 1973 Roe v Wade decision that enshrined a woman's right to an abortion, saying that individual states can now permit or restrict the procedure themselves.

Keep reading... Show less

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen

Sixteen states vying for the early slots in 2024’s presidential primary calendar pitched their case to the Democratic National Committee on Wednesday and Thursday, touting their history, diversity, economies, and electoral competitiveness in the general election.

State party officials, a governor, lt. governors, an attorney general, members of Congress, senior staff and party strategists touted their electorates, industries, heritage, and features that would propel presidential candidates and draw national scrutiny, which pleased the officials on the DNC Rules and Bylaws Committee (RBC). But the panel’s leaders also probed whether Republicans in otherwise promising states would seek to impede a revised Democratic primary calendar.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}