The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

While recent reports that two of special counsel Robert Mueller’s prosecutors have left his team after its recent successes led some to suspect that the Russia investigation is winding down, a new court decision reveals that there’s still much about the investigation that the public doesn’t know.

In response to a petition from several media outlets to obtain the search warrants used to gather evidence against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, a D.C. district court decided that many of the documents cannot be released because, in part, they relate to “non-public information concerning the government’s ongoing criminal investigation.”

The decision also says that some of the documents include “private information of non-parties” and “financial information” that should not be publicly disclosed.

In other words, Mueller apparently has leads and other strands of information that are related to ongoing cases — whether directly tied to the Russia investigation itself or to the numerous investigations in his spawned and touched upon.

Since the major domestic charges in Mueller’s probe have largely been resolved in the cases of Manafort, Michael Flynn, George Papadopoulos, and Rick Gates, the decision is a reminder that the investigation may have many more avenues to pursue before it wraps up. These may or may not relate to lines of investigation already known to the public.

One possible investigatory avenue that court may be protecting is a potential case against Robert Stone. The long-time right-wing purveyor of dirty tricks is believed to be in Mueller’s sights, and Stone himself has said he would not be surprised if he ends up charged in the investigation. The one-time Trump aide left the president’s official team early in the campaign, but he is believed to have had persistent ties with the candidate. Stone’s own potential contacts with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and the reported Russian cut-out Guccifer 2.0 have raised suspicions about his own activities during the campaign as they relate to election interference.

And since Stone had a long personal and business relationship with Manafort, it would not be surprising if search warrants on the former campaign chairman turned up evidence related to the dirty trickster.

Cody Fenwick is a reporter and editor. Follow him on Twitter @codytfenwick.

 

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

Photo by The White House

Two tiresome realities about being president of the United States: first, everybody blames you for things over which you have little or no control: such as the worldwide price of oil, and international shipping schedules. Should there be too few electronic gee-gaws on store shelves to pacify American teenagers this Christmas, it will be Joe Biden’s fault.

Second, everybody gives you advice, whether you ask for it or not. Everywhere you look, Democrats and Democratically-inclined pundits are tempted to panic. “The cold reality for Biden,” writes New York Magazine’s Jonathan Chait “is that his presidency is on the brink of failure.” A return to Trumpism, and essentially the end of American democracy, strikes Chait as altogether likely.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}