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Early signs of a bitter general election race emerged on Twitter Thursday afternoon, when the Trump and Clinton campaigns made jabs at each other on Twitter following President Obama’s endorsement of Clinton.

The Clinton campaign was succinct in its response. (Only Tweets signed “-H” are from Clinton herself.)

Those three words launched a Twitter firestorm, with two big names in the Republican establishment – RNC Chair Reince Priebus and Communications Director Sean Spicer – bringing up Clinton’s email scandal.

Trump joined in later that afternoon as well, garnering a little more support from the Twittersphere but still a fraction of Clinton’s retweets and favorites.

Photo: A combination photo shows U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (R) in Los Angeles, California on May 5, 2016 and in Eugene, Oregon, U.S. on May 6, 2016 respectively.  REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (L) and Jim Urquhart/File Photos

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Richard Spencer

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

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Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

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