Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

The Democratic National Committee announced on Friday the lineup for the first debates of the primary season. Because a large number of candidates — 20 — qualified to be on the debate stage, the DNC decided to hold two debates on two separate nights.

To make things even more confusing, they assigned candidates semi-randomly to each night. It wasn’t entirely random, though, because the committee didn’t want to end up with one night featuring many more stronger candidates than the other, so they split the candidates into two groups — those with a significant showing in national polls, and those with around 2 percent or less — and tried to divide the more popular group evenly between the two nights.

Here’s how it all worked out.

Appearing on Wednesday, June 26:

  • Cory Booker
  • Julián Castro
  • Bill de Blasio
  • John Delaney
  • Tulsi Gabbard
  • Jay Inslee
  • Amy Klobuchar
  • Beto O’Rourke
  • Elizabeth Warren

Appearing on Thursday, June 27:

  • Joe Biden
  • Michael Bennet
  • Pete Buttigieg
  • Kirsten Gillibrand
  • Kamala Harris
  • John Hickenlooper
  • Bernie Sanders
  • Eric Swalwell
  • Marianne Williamson
  • Andrew Yang

These four candidates failed to qualify for the debate entirely:

  • Steve Bullock
  • Seth Moulton
  • Wayne Messam
  • Mike Gravel
 IMAGE: Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez.

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

The coronavirus pandemic has changed much about American politics and society—but not everything. One constant is that Republicans believe a lot of stupid things about how to run a country. Correction: Who knows what they actually believe. Is it better if they're lying rather than deluded? Either way, Republicans definitely say a lot of stupid things.

One of their longest-standing vapidities is the hoary, cockeyed notion that government should be run like a business. Trump has said this, as has his supremely unqualified son-in-law Jared Kushner, and so did Mitt Romney during his 2012 presidential run, just to name a few.

Keep reading... Show less