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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

UPDATE: Beshear has declared victory and multiple outlets have called the race for him with nearly all of the votes counted, but Bevin says he will not concede and is expected to call for a recount. Despite Beshear’s lead, the Associated Press has called the race “too close to call.”

Democrat Andy Beshear has been projected to win Kentucky’s gubernatorial race on Tuesday night, defeating the incumbent Republican Matt Bevin in the deep-red state, according to NBC News.

President Donald Trump had held a rally in support of Bevin’s candidate just the night before the race. But the Democrat’s electoral strength in the urban and suburban parts of the state locked in a win for Beshear in the tight race.

And while the results are important and consequential for the state itself, the race — like almost everything else — will inevitably be interpreted through a national lens.

At his rally Monday night, Trump even suggested it would reflect poorly on him if Bevin lost.

“You gotta vote because if you lose, it sends a really bad message. It just sends a bad and they’re going to build it up,” he told the crowd, as Kyle Griffin noted. “You can’t let that happen to me.”

Others, however, noted that there are specific circumstances in Kentucky that gave Beshear an edge.

“Bevin was uniquely unpopular, even within his own party. Barely won majority in primary. Lowest approval of any governor in America,” said the National Journal’s Josh Kraushaar. He noted Bevin angered many Kentuckians by fighting with teachers and blocking Medicaid expansion. And many observers noted that while Beshear won the governor’s race, Republicans won other races on the ballot, suggesting Bevin’s unique unpopularity was key to his defeat.

But if a Republican can become uniquely unpopular by going after unions and taking away health care — two of the party’s reasons for being — Democrats should be able to cheer that fact and figure out how to leverage it for their own advantage.

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Dr. Mehmet Oz

Sean Parnell, the Trump-anointed candidate for Senate in Pennsylvania, dropped out of the race a week ago after a custody hearing that featured lurid details of his relationship with his ex-wife. Laurie Snell alleged that Parnell had struck her, choked her, left her by the side of the road and hit one of their sons hard enough to leave a welt on the boy's back. Parnell countered that she had invented all of it.

Custody battles are infamous for exaggerated accusations and heated denials, and it's difficult for outsiders to know whom to believe and how much. But Parnell's comments off the witness stand didn't burnish his credibility. Appearing on Fox Nation, for example, Parnell opined, "I feel like the whole 'happy wife, happy life' nonsense has done nothing but raise one generation of woman tyrants after the next." He wasn't finished. "Now there's an entire generation of men that don't want to put up with the BS of a high-maintenance, narcissistic woman." Well. Someone seems to be dealing with anger issues. The would-be — er, rather, won't-be — senator concluded with a short sermon on biology: "From an evolutionary standpoint, it used to be, you know, women were attracted to your strength because you could defend them from dinosaurs." Where does the GOP find these geniuses?

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