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In an unprecedented move for the Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump has admitted that he lied.

After repeatedly stating that he had watched ‘secret’ footage of a U.S. plane unloading money in Iran the same day four American detainees were released, Trump took to Twitter to acknowledge that he never watched such a video, because, of course, it does not exist.

“The plane I saw on television was the hostage plane in Geneva, Switzerland, not the plane carrying $400 million in cash going to Iran!” Trump clarified on Friday.

Trump made this false claim twice this week. On Thursday, in Maine, he said the nonexistent video was provided by Iran “to embarrass our president because we have a president who’s incompetent.” But now, Trump admits he confused footage of the released American hostages arriving in Geneva, Switzerland, with a plane carrying ‘bribe’ money to Iran.

In true Trump etiquette, he offered no apologies.

Photo: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Scranton, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 27, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

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Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

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