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In an unprecedented move for the Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump has admitted that he lied.

After repeatedly stating that he had watched ‘secret’ footage of a U.S. plane unloading money in Iran the same day four American detainees were released, Trump took to Twitter to acknowledge that he never watched such a video, because, of course, it does not exist.

“The plane I saw on television was the hostage plane in Geneva, Switzerland, not the plane carrying $400 million in cash going to Iran!” Trump clarified on Friday.

Trump made this false claim twice this week. On Thursday, in Maine, he said the nonexistent video was provided by Iran “to embarrass our president because we have a president who’s incompetent.” But now, Trump admits he confused footage of the released American hostages arriving in Geneva, Switzerland, with a plane carrying ‘bribe’ money to Iran.

In true Trump etiquette, he offered no apologies.

Photo: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Scranton, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 27, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

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