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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

“It’s like the devil making a deal with the devil.”

That’s how Jimmy Kimmel describes Donald Trump campaigning in Texas for his former adversary Ted Cruz, who faces a spirited challenge from Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke. To illustrate the point, Jimmy and his producers cut a Trump commercial for Senator Cruz that recalls all the high points of their relationship.

Kimmel closes with his most persuasive argument for a Cruz defeat: After he debased himself again by kissing Trump’s ass, how funny would losing be?

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Jen Psaki

Photo by White House

Today was White House Secretary Jen Psaki’s final day. Karine Jean-Pierre will be taking Psaki’s place in front of the press during the daily briefings. Jen Psaki has been a steady and welcome fixture in an administration that has been tasked with cleaning up the catastrophic destruction of the previous administration. It was a sad day in some respects, as Psaki has been a highlight for many, offering up witty and solid rebuttals to the steady fact-free propaganda of the right-wing media sphere.

Psaki began her final briefing by thanking the Biden administration, the Biden family, the press, and her husband, saying that anyone with children knows that they cannot execute any of their professional work without the support of a spouse. It was an emotional thank you that Psaki handled with the same level of grace that she has been able to apply to her daily press briefings over the past 16 months. Psaki opened the floor to questions and answered questions about abortion, inflation, supply shortages, and COVID-19, and then she signed off.

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Georgia State Capitol

Youtube Screenshot

The reason public support for same-sex marriage (and LGBTQ rights, more broadly) shifted from roughly 40 percent support in the mid-aughts to a record 70 percent last year is two-fold: 1) a generation of Americans came out in kitchen-table conversations across the country; and 2) a decade's worth of earned media educated voters about heartbreaking injustices between the enactment of same-sex marriage bans and their eventual demise at the Supreme Court in 2015.

Americans decided it just wasn't right that a human being wasn't allowed to hold the hand of their lifelong partner as they passed away in a hospital, or that a spouse was denied Social Security survivor benefits because the federal government didn't recognize their marriage.

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