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Donald Trump’s ongoing determination to conceal his tax returns — unlike any other president since Nixon — is annoying Jimmy Kimmel, who snarks: “He’s holding onto those tax returns tighter than an extra-crispy drumstick from KFC.” But the late-night comic has his own theory to explain why Trump doesn’t want us to see his tax returns. It’s an ego thing.

That oversize Trumpian ego heaved into view when he visited Mount Vernon, the home George Washington, with Melania, Emmanuel Macron, and the French president’s wife last year. We’re only learning details about the embarrassing incident now, but it seems that Trump insulted the Washingtons’ distinguished American home. He said the rooms were too small.

Quickly bored by the tour, he demanded to know whether Washington was “really rich” — and confided what the first president would have done “if he was really smart.” You’ll never guess.

As Kimmel observes: “If he were your uncle, it would be funny, right?”

Right! So click and chuckle as if someone else is president.

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President Joe Biden

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We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

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Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

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