The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday endorsed Democrat Hillary Clinton, the group’s first-ever endorsement for a presidential nominee and a rebuke of Republican Donald Trump in the middle of his party’s convention.

The Trump campaign “has gone from frankly something that was entertaining, comical, and has devolved into something that is frankly scary,” said Javier Palomarez, the chamber president and chief executive officer.

He said the group weighed in because of Trump’s rhetoric, which has angered many in the U.S. minority community. Trump has been accused of bigotry for his hard line on immigration, and many of his comments have been blasted as racist ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election.

“It wasn’t a step that was taken easily,” Palomarez said, noting that many of the chamber’s board and members are “staunch Republicans.”

Trump kicked off his campaign last year saying Mexico was sending rapists and drug dealers across the border, and he proposed building a wall to stop them. He has called for a temporary ban on Muslim immigrants to shore up national security and suggested an Indiana-born federal judge was unable to hear a lawsuit against his Trump University venture because the judge is of Mexican descent.

The New York businessman’s positions have angered minority groups, liberals, Democrats, and even some Republicans, who have called them racist, divisive and callous.

Among black, Hispanic and Asian voters polled in the first 15 days of July, 70 percent supported Clinton while 9 percent supported Trump, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll. Over that time, 45 percent of all likely voters supported Clinton and 34 percent supported Trump.

Trump became his party’s official nominee to the presidency on Tuesday at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Palomarez said the Clinton campaign earned their group’s endorsement by doing significant outreach to Latinos, including asking to speak with chamber members in different parts of the country.

“I think she understands the challenges of American small businesses,” he said.

The convention had a dramatic start, as anti-Trump delegates tried, and failed, to force a roll-call vote that would record the number of delegates opposed to the New York real estate developer.

The chamber is an organization of Hispanic business leaders representing the interests ofHispanic-owned businesses nationwide. It had endorsed Clinton and Republican John Kasich in their respective primaries, the group’s first-ever such endorsements.

 

(Reporting by Luciana Lopez; Editing by David Gregorio)

Photo: U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton smiles as she visits Galvanize, a learning community for technology, in Denver, U.S. June 28, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) is under mounting criticism for refusing to support a Democratic bill that would make access to abortion the law of the land, as the U.S. Supreme Court, experts believe, prepares to reverse its historic 1973 ruling in Roe v. Wade.

Senator Collins, who repeatedly claims to be pro-choice, is being criticized after years of supporting then-President Donald Trump's judicial nominees at every level of the federal judiciary, including two of his three Supreme Court picks.

Keep reading... Show less

French President Emanuel Macron, left, and US President Joe Biden

Reprinted with permission from Creators

About France and its submarines: Australia's decision to cancel a $60 billion contract to buy them and purchase American nuclear subs instead had to hurt. In response, France's foreign minister called the U.S.-backed move a "stab in the back," and President Emmanuel Macron recalled his ambassadors from both Washington and Canberra.

The backstory should take precedence over the drama flowing from the rift between America and its oldest ally. It centers on a growing alarm at Chinese aggression in the Pacific and how seriously the U.S. and its Pacific allies are taking it.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}