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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

Frank Figliuzzi, the former Assistant Director for Counterintelligence at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, on Sunday warned that Donald Trump’s behavior in the White House—and particularly his treatment of Attorney General Jeff Sessions—is an “extension of the mob family mentality,” insisting “we’re in a danger zone” if the president moves to fire either his attorney general or Deputy Attorney Rod Rosenstein.

Figliuzzi was discussing the stunning New York Times report, published Saturday, that alleges Rosenstein was secretly recording Trump and discussed invoking the 25th amendment to remove him from office.

“We’re in a danger zone here because we still see the extension of the mob family mentality, that the consigliere is supposed to be loyal to the capo,” Figliuzzi said. “That’s how he views his attorney general. Of course the attorney general works for us. Of course he is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States. Where’s the danger here? Look, we are clearly headed toward a firing of the attorney general and likely Rosenstein soon after the November midterms and that is the danger zone for the special counsel.”

“I have to tell you, when the news broke of the deputy attorney general’s statement, I put myself in the shoes of the [Bob] Mueller team listening to this, and I would imagine everything in his office stopped dead as they wondered if this was the day, if this was the weekend where the president would fire the deputy attorney general, put someone in to remove Mueller,” he said. “I have to tell you, they must looked like an embassy about to be undertaken. That day is going to come.”

Watch below:

Elizabeth Preza is the Managing Editor of AlterNet. Follow her on Twitter @lizacisms.

 

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