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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

As the Supreme Court prepares to rule on the Constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), Republican congressman Phil Gingrey of Georgia took to the House floor to make the argument for the discriminatory legislation.

Children, he insists, need both a mother and a father… and should be taught — in separate classes for little boys and little girls, of course — proper, traditional gender roles in school. Because mommies do mommy things, and daddies do daddy things.

“You know, maybe part of the problem is we need to go back into the schools at a very early age, maybe at the grade school level, and have a class for the young girls and have a class for the young boys and say, you know, this is what’s important,” Gingrey suggests. “This is what a father does that is maybe a little different, maybe a little bit better than the talents that a mom has in a certain area. And the same thing for the young girls, that, you know, this is what a mom does, and this is what is important from the standpoint of that union which we call marriage.”

And though he believes children need two parents, Gingrey — who is running for retiring Saxby Chambliss’ Senate seat in 2014 — is quite clear that same-sex parents simply do not make the grade. Mommy can work, but afterwards, she should be coming home to daddy. The adult females in his family, he points out, all have jobs. “But they’re still there as moms,” he says. “And when they come home and take over that responsibility, they need a shared partner, and that partner is that partner for life. And I’m talking about, of course, the father.”

If you can stand it, watch this stunning display of sexism and homophobia below:

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